{ Archive for October, 2013 }

Protect your plants from winter snow

We got our first big snow of the year this week–a good six inches of heavy, wet stuff. It is melting and blowing away as we speak, but it has already done some damage: my ninebarks are flattened.

These were four feet tall. If I had braved the storm, I could have shook them off as the snow came down and saved them. Unfortunately, I slept through most of it.

I’m not overly worried about most of my perennials; they don’t care about some broken end-of-season stems. Even the ninebarks will likely come through not much worse for the wear. My young Medora juniper, however, took a beating last year and kind of languished through the summer. It is getting a burlap teepee this year to protect it both from dumps of snow and the wind: conifers continue to transpire moisture throughout the year and so are particularly vulnerable to drying winter winds.

Poor thing is looking kind of rough, but I'm hoping a little protection might help him through the winter. Use stakes and weatherproof fabric and be sure to leave air space for the plant to breathe.

The other thing I’m looking at is installing some snow guards on our metal roof. Snow comes sliding off in huge hunks sometimes, and one of my cold frames got smashed pretty well to pieces by being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

A rail-style snow guard by Euramax Canada

 

Will you be reading The Signature of All Things?

One of the reasons I love fall is that it gives me more time to read. There’s so much to do in the garden over the summer, I don’t think I relaxed in my lounger with a good book more than once! Don’t get me wrong, I still have a LOT to do to put my garden to bed for the winter, but I can now spare a couple of hours here and there to curl up under a blanket with a hot cup of tea and a good book. One of the new books I’ve been looking forward to reading is The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert (author of Eat, Pray Love) because the main character is a botanist. You can read a review of it on the Globe and Mail website (I started, but stopped because I felt it was giving too much away), and read a synopsis or purchase on the Indigo website. Does anyone want to read the book and then chat about it in a few weeks?

 

Tree stumps and saltpeter

One of the great advantages of gardening out in the country is being able to do large scale projects.

One of the great drawbacks of gardening out in the country is finding professionals willing to travel to your residence to help you with large scale projects.

After having the power company remove three poplars from the front yard (due to their proximity to a power line), I spent some time trying to get a hold of an arbourist to come and grind the leftover stumps. No dice.

As much as my kids wouldn’t care if the stumps stayed (play value=very high), they’re a nuisance to mow and trim around and they’re constantly sprouting scraggly growth. And they’re just kind of ugly.

They are rotting away a bit, but not fast enough for me. I’ve decided it’s time to give up on the professionals and help Mother Nature along myself. I bought some stump remover and applied it several weeks ago.

Step 1: Using a wood boring bit, drill one inch holes in several places around the stump (the deeper the better). Drill similar holes at an angle into the side of the stump, creating vents for the main holes.

Step 2: Pour some of the stump remover into each hole (read the label for amounts). Pour hot water into the holes to dissolve the crystals.

It’s a pretty simple process. The stump remover basically just speeds up decomposition. You can help it by keeping the stump damp, even going so far as to cover it with plastic to hold in moisture. The label advises allowing at least 4-6 weeks for the process to work. This is what one of my stumps looked like after five weeks of intermittent rain and my total neglect.

Rotting nicely. When I pulled the grass away from the base of the stump I could see the wood crumbling quite a bit.

While doing some research on this whole process, I stumbled across an interesting fact: potassium nitrate, the active ingredient in this stump remover product, is also sometimes called saltpeter. If that word conjures visions of pirates and cannonballs, there’s a reason. It’s one of the main elements in gunpowder. That’s right, gunpowder. Which made the final step in the stump removal process seem suddenly much more exciting.

You can just let everything rot and then hack out the debris, but the manufacturer recommends starting a fire on the stump to burn out the remaining wood.

That’s right, fill your stump with saltpeter, then light it on fire.

Am I a pyromaniac, or does that not just sound fun?

The science behind it is the absorbed saltpeter allows the fire to burn right through to the roots of the stump, whereas a normal fire would burn only until it ran out of oxygen–pretty fast when you’re underground.

How can I not try this?

I got it started with a few leaves and some dry sawdust; some recommend a few charcoal briquettes or some kerosene (NOT gasoline). Be prepared though: it's a slow burn that must be watched for several hours or even a few days.

I was going to rake leaves today…

Ah! But what about…

I was gonna…

Now I can’t…

Sigh.

Today WAS the day to get going on mulching leaves. And I’ve barely made a dent in my long fall to-do list.

This morning I got a little wound up over this slap upside the head from the elements. A total loss of perspective, you could call it. As in, “That’s it, I’m done for the year. Cue the hibernation.”

As if I don’t live in Alberta and the forecast for the weekend is right back to perfect raking weather.

It makes me think of a turn of phrase oft employed by a friend of mine: “It’s not eternal.” As in, “This can be dealt with, passed through, and forgotten.” Her little phrase has helped me think differently about the daily annoyances of life: the spilt milk, the forgotten backpack, the overlooked phone message.

Frustrating? Yes. Insurmountable? No.

Snow melts. The leaves will be there when I get to them.

The flip side of this truth–and most deep truths do have a flip side–is that some things are eternal. Like the kid who forgot that backpack, and your relationship with him.

And that gardening to-do list. It’s eternal too, as in it will never be done. Kind of like laundry and dishes– but that’s just too depressing. Let’s stick with the garden.

I sometimes seem to operate on an unspoken assumption that one day I will complete everything I want to do with the garden, and that I’d better get on with getting it done. When I spell it out like that, it is obviously a delusion. A garden cycles, evolves, dies and is reborn, but it is never done. Not only that, doesn’t such an attitude suck all the joy out of the pursuit? And isn’t joy one of the main reasons I showed up to this party?

In the snow today, I’m letting go of the hurry and worry, and reminding myself that by participating in my garden’s eternity, I can experience some incarnation of this beauty every year. I can continually create something here as long as I breathe, even with the knowledge that breathing is not eternal.

Keeping retired garden hoses busy

One of my tasks for this week is draining and storing all the garden hoses. (Yes, ALL. An acre of land+no sprinkler system=lots of hoses.)

Often there’s one that I finally decide is beyond repair and needs to be put out to pasture. But what to do with these steel, plastic, and rubber aggregates? Many recyclers won’t take them, landfills hate them. The best thing I can think of is to repurpose them.

First option is to turn a leaky hose into a leakier hose: poke some more holes in it and use it as a soaker hose.

If it’s not up to that task, you can cut it into lengths for all kinds of applications:

For cutting through the tough layers of hose, I like to use an old serrated knife.

A simple guard for the blade of our bow saw.

The old rubber handles went the way of the earth long ago; now we use these for grips on the wheelbarrow. Also try slipping them over the wire handles of buckets.

Or if you’re feeling crafty:

Mark Kintzel's old hose repurposed as a doormat (click the pic for how-to)

Jill Fritz's fresh invention (click for the how-to)

And if you just can’t get enough hose-related goodness, have no fear, Pinterest is here.

Attention poinsettia keepers

I am embarking on a test of concentration and dedication.

I have kept my poinsettia going from last Christmas, and it is now time to help it “flower” again. This requires keeping it in the absolute, uninterrupted dark 14 hours a day, and bright sunlight at least six hours a day. As suspiciously as this sounds like a schedule, I, the queen of distraction and misplaced to-do lists, am going to attempt it.

I first learned the ins and outs of poinsettia keeping from a column Karen York did in the 2013 Annual edition of Canadian Gardening. It’s true, I may have neglected a few of her well-explained steps (such as monthly fertilizing and cutting it back in early spring), and I never did take it outside for the summer. But it’s stayed a happy houseplant in spite of me, and I figure it’s worth a shot to get those red bracts back.

Karen’s tips specify starting this controlled light regimen October 1, so I’m right on time! Yay me! I’ve put an alarm on my iPad for every morning so I’ll remember to get it out from under its cardboard box in the closet. I think I’ll remember to put it away at night if it’s smack in the middle of the kitchen counter…

On second thought, I’ll set an alarm for evenings too.