{ Author Archive - Tara Nolan }

Join the #UsedParty tomorrow night

I’ll admit it. I can be a bit of a pack rat. I’ll tuck items away for future projects and crafts–sometimes those items even make it into the garden. That is why tomorrow night (Wednesday, March 19), I’m looking forward to joining UsedEverywhere.com’s Twitter chat, aka #UsedParty. The theme of the chat is Upcycling for the Garden. I look forward to sharing a few ideas and hope to gain some crafty inspiration from some of the other panellists: @GatherVictoria@commoncentsmom and @YoungUrbnFarmer. If you leave a comment on UsedEverywhere.com‘s blog, I will be choosing a question to answer and that person will win a one-year subscription to Canadian Gardening magazine. Keep in mind the chat is at 6 p.m. PST, so that makes it 9 p.m. EST here in Southern Ontario. See you on Twitter! (P.S. Our Twitter handle is @CdnGardening.)

‘Tis the season for Seedy Saturdays

This past weekend, I headed to St. Catharines with my husband to attend Niagara Seedy Saturday. The event was bustling. I could barely get near some of the seed tables at certain points, the seminar I attended about composting was standing room only, and the fresh roast beef lunch and pie served by the church where the event was held was evidently really popular. Read the rest of this entry »

A welcome preview of Canada Blooms 2014

Last week, during one of those ridiculously freezing days, I headed to a preview for Canada Blooms. This was the first year that the preview was so early. In past years, it has taken place the morning the show officially opened. I think it was really smart to start building excitement early and give the media a glimpse of what’s in store. I know for a fact I’m not the only gardener who is planning seed orders and new garden designs, and desperately longing for spring. The event featured a honey tasting courtesy of the Toronto Botanical Garden (they were also giving away okra seeds to complement their world crop garden theme), a floral competition and a preview from some of the landscape designers and gardeners who will be working on the feature gardens. Read the rest of this entry »

DIY holiday gift idea: Terrarium ornaments

I first discovered air plants at the Tropical Expressions booth at Canada Blooms a few years ago. I was fascinated that they do not require soil, and I learned that air plants collect water from the rain. They also attach themselves to and derive nutrients from other plants (though they’re not considered parasitic).

I incorporated air plants into an article about quick and easy holiday terrariums for Canadian Living‘s January 2013 issue. Because of their minimal care requirements, air plants can be popped into one of those clear, plastic or glass ornaments you can purchase at craft stores. I also created another option, which involved planting succulents in a larger glass ornament. All the how-to information can be found in the Crafts section on CanadianLiving.com.

These ornaments make great gifts, but be sure to make a few for yourself!


photo by Joe Kim/TC Media

Putting together my holiday urn

This morning the sun was shining, it was mild and the birds were singing in my weeping mulberry. I decided it was the perfect time to go outside and put together my holiday urn. The sun promptly disappeared, but I was already in the mood to create, so I didn’t care. My urn is a mix of materials I bought (though I hate paying for stuff I can find in the woods for free) and things I gathered from my yard (and garage).

Here’s a list of what went into the mix:

  • I started by cutting a birch branch I found while on a hike (it was on the ground!) in two and stuck both branches firmly in the soil that was left over from my fall urn. There’s a nice fork in one of the branches, so I’m technically following the rule of threes! I added a bit more soil to anchor them in.
  • Next, I placed my pine boughs around the exterior. This was the only greenery I purchased (I grabbed a small bunch), since I don’t have anything like this on my property.
  • I also bought sticks. But only because I don’t know where I can covertly snip red osier dogwood in these here parts. My house sits up a bit from the road and my urn could look like a big blob of green, so I wanted a pop of colour with the red sticks. I placed these around the birch branches.
  • Then I took a walk around the yard, snipping two types of cedar branches, which I interspersed with the pine boughs.
  • I wanted to add a wee bit of sparkle, so I stuck three silvery stars on sticks around the birch. I had more, but I wanted to keep it subtle.
  • I crowned the centre with three enormous pinecones that I bought at the Toronto Christmas Market last year.

And that’s it! I fiddled a bit with all the branches to make them just so, but I’m happy with the result. Here are some pics:

It took a bit of fiddling to get the branches just so. I like the pine because it drapes nicely over the sides. The one type of cedar I used is a bit more one-dimensional, so it fits nicely in between, while the other type of cedar is fuller, adding depth and a bit of height here and there.

Here you can see the contrasting greenery a little better.

And this closeup shows the silvery stars--they're not that bad, right?--in contrast with the red branches, giant pinecones and birch.

2-second garden tip: A trick to keep paperwhites upright

Today’s 2-second garden tip was first printed in the Winter 2006 issue of Canadian Gardening. It has been on the website ever since and every year I remind our readers of this clever trick. Here is a link to the original article that has a bit more info: Keep your paperwhites upright. And, here is our Pinterest-worthy tip:

2-second garden tip: Tucking in dahlia tubers

Today’s tip comes via garden writer Veronica Sliva. Veronica and I have known each other for a few years as members of the Garden Writers Association. In fact, Veronica was the regional director when we first met. We usually see each other throughout the spring and summer months at various gardening events, from Canada Blooms to the Toronto Botanical Garden’s annual Through the Garden Gate tour. That is, if Veronica is not off leading tours around the world for GardeningTours.com.

A prolific garden writer, Veronica creates columns and articles for both print and web (including CanadianGardening.com), as well as for her own website, A Gardener’s World.

Here is Veronica’s autumn-based 2-second tip:

2-second garden tip: Clever cloches

Halifax-based garden writer Niki Jabbour and I met at the annual Garden Writers Association luncheon at Canada Blooms two years ago. Since then, we’ve been corresponding, mostly via social media like Twitter and Facebook, and I’ve been a guest a couple of times on her radio show, The Weekend Gardener.

Niki is the author of the upcoming book Groundbreaking Food Gardens, which will be released by Storey Publishing in March 2014. She also penned the award-winning book The Year Round Vegetable Gardener, which is a fantastic resource for those gardeners who don’t want to confine their edible gardening to our short, Canadian summers. It’s also the name of her blog.

It seemed logical that Niki provide our next 2-second garden tip, which speaks to extending the harvest. I know I’ll be on the lookout for unwanted punch bowls from now on!


Image courtesy of the Year Round Vegetable Gardener, Storey Publishing.

DIY holiday gift idea: Herbal tea

Well before most of my garden had called it quits for the season, I decided to dry a few herbs. I snipped bunches of sage, oregano, French tarragon and spearmint. As I was crumbling my spearmint to save for tea the other day, I though to myself: “Wouldn’t this make a cute Christmas gift?” For my birthday, my friend Brenda gave me one of those ceramic jars from Anthropologie with the chalkboard label on the front, as well as a package of these lovely little drawstring tea bags. This is the perfect packaging if you choose to share some of your herbs. Looseleaf tea bags can be found at most tea shops. I would recommend a teaspoon of dried herbs in each. Or, make it a spice jar and fill it with savoury herbs you’ve dried, like oregano or thyme.

Writing in chalk was the hardest part. I must have erased various wordings (Tara's tea, peppermint, etc.) at least 20 times. I settled on "Tea" because it was short and sweet.

2-second garden tip: Add a peony hoop now

The second 2-second garden tip in our new Pinterest series comes from Amy Andrychowicz who writes the Get Busy Gardening blog. Amy and I met and hung out at the annual Garden Writers Association Symposium this past summer in Quebec City. What really impressed me about Amy is that for her day job she is a software developer, yet she has devoted what I’m guessing is a lot of spare time (and passion) to create gorgeous gardens around her Minneapolis, Minnesota home (USDA zone 4b!). She also finds the time to regularly update her blog with lots of great gardening tips. Now that winter is coming, Amy will be turning her attention to her indoor garden. Apparently she has a big collection of houseplants, succulents and tropical plants.

I have to admit, I first saw this tip on the Get Busy Gardening Facebook fan page. I asked Amy if she would mind if I turned it into a 2-second garden tip, which she happily agreed to. Voilà!

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