{ Author Archive - Tara Nolan }

A short post about overwintering my fig tree

I was going to keep this post short and sweet, but I thought I should say a bit more about overwintering my fig than simply that I brought it into the garage.

Before getting my fig tree cosied up in its winter home, I first had to remove two small figs that appeared in September. I was so excited because my fig tree was a mere stick when Steven Biggs (aka The Fig Pig) gave it to me at the end of last winter. I tweeted Steven (@noguffsteve) to ask what I should do with my wee crop. He said that the figs probably formed a bit too late to ripen this year, so I should break them off by winter if they did not fall off themselves (check!).

Can you spot the wee fig?

By next July, Steven said I should get my first crop of breba figs. Breba is the name given to the crop that grows off the previous year’s shoot growth. There will be a second crop later in the summer that will grow off next year’s shoot growth.

I should add that I brought the fig tree into the garage after a couple of light frosts, but before our first hard frost. The leaves were starting to drop, indicating that the tree was going into dormancy. My garage is the perfect place for overwintering because it is fairly dark and cool, but above freezing.

Steven recently posted on his blog about overwintering figs outdoors using a “door” method. It’s worth a read if you can’t bring your fig trees inside!

2-second garden tip: Saving plants from fall containers

Today I am launching the first in what will be a series of “2-second garden tips” here on the blog (and on Pinterest). I’m going to be asking fellow gardeners for quick, informative tips that I can turn into interesting Pinterest graphics like the one below (by the way, check out our Pinterest boards here). My first tip was inspired by my fall container. I purchased a lovely heuchera with grey-green and purplish foliage and a requisite chrysanthemum (along with some annuals and kale). There was no way I was going to send the heuchera or the mums to the compost, so I planted them in my garden (with fingers crossed they’ll survive the winter). Now my pots are ready for pine boughs and birch branches and whatever else I find to stuff in them.

The graphic was designed by our talented design intern, Emily Swift, who is working on all of TC Media’s brands, from Elle Canada to Style at Home. I’m hoping to post a tip a week, so stay tuned. Oh, and if you like the tip, please share it with your Pinterest friends!

The garlic has taken over my raised beds

Two years ago I planted garlic for the first time. I had just moved into a new home in mid-October, but I grabbed some organic Ontario garlic from the market in town and planted a few last-minute cloves. I think I got about twelve heads of garlic, but I was over the moon and quickly used it up in my cooking.

Part of my first-ever garlic harvest drying in the garage (hence the bad lighting)!

Last fall, I dropped the ball completely and was not happy about my garlic-less garden this summer. I vowed not to let it happen again. So when I saw a Facebook post by fellow garden writer Niki Jabbour (aka The Year-Round Veggie Gardener) recommending Eureka Garlic, I decided I should plan ahead and place an order.  I did a little Googling and discovered that the garlic Al Picketts grows for Eureka is chemical-free. I emailed Al for a list and was overwhelmed by the 79 varieties that arrived in my inbox.

My garlic order from Eureka Garlic

In the middle of my decision making, I happened to run into Liz Primeau, who wrote In Pursuit of Garlic a couple of years ago. Liz was anxious to get her hands on the rare Rose de Lautrec at the Stratford Garlic Festival in September. She recommended I speak to a couple of ladies who would be there for advice. Unfortunately I couldn’t make it, so I went back and read some of Liz’s book and after a bit more research, I settled on ‘Music’, ‘Persian Star’, ‘French Rocambole’ and ‘Polish Hardneck’. I felt nervous about putting all the garlic in one bed, so I divvied it up amongst my two raised beds (which took up about half the space in each), added a couple along the side of my house and plunked the last four or five cloves in a sunny perennial garden at the very front of my property.

Keeping track in my garden diary

To plant, I followed some of the tips in this step-by-step article by Katharine Fletcher. Is it too early to be excited for July?

Will you be reading The Signature of All Things?

One of the reasons I love fall is that it gives me more time to read. There’s so much to do in the garden over the summer, I don’t think I relaxed in my lounger with a good book more than once! Don’t get me wrong, I still have a LOT to do to put my garden to bed for the winter, but I can now spare a couple of hours here and there to curl up under a blanket with a hot cup of tea and a good book. One of the new books I’ve been looking forward to reading is The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert (author of Eat, Pray Love) because the main character is a botanist. You can read a review of it on the Globe and Mail website (I started, but stopped because I felt it was giving too much away), and read a synopsis or purchase on the Indigo website. Does anyone want to read the book and then chat about it in a few weeks?

 

Moody hues in my fall container

This past weekend, I cleaned out my summer containers, sending half-dead annuals to the compost (I felt a bit guilty about this since there were still a couple of tenacious blooms). I wasn’t ready to sacrifice my lemongrass, so I stuck it in the vegetable garden to use in my fall curries. Then, I headed to the nursery–or rather, a couple of nurseries–to buy some plants for my fall-themed containers. I wavered between the traditional, warm colours of autumn–reds, oranges and yellows–and what I’ve started calling the moody hues–deep purples, blues and cool greens. I went for the moody palette. When I got home and started putting things together, I had a couple of spaces to fill, so I dug one of my Vates blue kale from my vegetable garden to pair with the purple ornamental one, and dug up some stubborn ajuga that had found its way into a random patch of grass.

Here is my first container. It’s the main focal point of my front entrance. Starting clockwise from the purple and “blue” kale, you will see I included some hot pink mums. They’re not particularly moody, but I like that they’re an unexpected colour for fall. And they went with the rest of my palette. That brownish-purple-tinged foliage you can kind of see underneath everything in the middle is the errant ajuga. Then, an ornamental black pepper plant. At least I think they’re ornamental. I won’t be tasting them. But I saw these funky, almost-black plants used as an accent in some gardens in Quebec and thought they’d be perfect for fall. To the left of that is a heuchera. I love love love the veiny purple and green pattern on the leaves, but check out the underside of the one leaf. It’s a rich purple that complements the mums really well.

For my main container, I focused on filling it as full as possible, adding soil into the empty holes.

My next container is in a smaller pot, so I kept things simple:

Clockwise from the top, is another black pepper, an ajuga (I actually paid for this one, though it's prettier than the "weeds" I dug up), an ornamental cabbage and way to the left, ajuga weeds.

And my last pot, which I placed between two Muskoka chairs I have out front, is even simpler.

One big ornamental cabbage hogging the pot.

Here’s a shot where you can see two of my pots in the same frame. I think it will look nice if I can find some of those cool grey pumpkins to perhaps place around them and complete the look!

Waiting to be accessorized!

A rose of Sharon cautionary tale

I inherited four rose of Sharon trees with my current house. They had all been meticulously pruned by the previous owner, when we moved in a couple of years ago, so I really didn’t need to do anything to them for awhile—or so I thought.

The first fall, I’m guessing the owner snipped all the seed pods before we moved in in mid October. But last fall, these lovely little pods appeared. With the branches still looking all neat and compact, I figured no pruning required and forgot about them altogether. Big mistake. This past spring, hundreds of mini rose of Sharons sprouted up around each tree like eager little weeds. If I had a greenhouse, I could start a rose of Sharon nursery and make money. Instead, I’ve tried to painstakingly pull each one out. But I’ve got a long way to go until they’re gone completely.

So, this fall, any seed pod that I happen to see will immediately be snipped into a yard bag and disposed of.

They're quite pretty and innocent-looking when they're in bloom...

...but watch out! If you don't nip those seed pods in the bud, this will happen!

A proud potato moment

This past spring, I purchased a little bag of French fingerling seed potatoes from Urban Harvest at Canada Blooms. I couldn’t wait to get them in the ground. I didn’t plant the whole bag, because I don’t think I realized how much space each plant needs, so I plunked two potatoes in a wooden, rectangular container box and two in one of my raised beds. It didn’t take long for these wee little plants to poke through the soil. I mounded the plants when they got to the appropriate size, as per the package directions, but then the plants grew like crazy and I was never sure if I’d mounded them enough. The package didn’t tell me when my potatoes would be ready, so I Googled when to harvest and found this helpful video by Ken Salvail. Ken says he has always been told to wait a couple of weeks after the plants have started blooming. I waited a little longer because three out of the four plants never bloomed. Then I got impatient and once I dug up one plant, I dug up all the rest.

There were some rather big potatoes–way bigger than what I would call a fingerling–a few fingerling-sized ‘taters and babies that clearly had some more growing left to do. I’m wondering if maybe I should have left them in longer. I ate some of the bigger ones two nights in a row and then had to leave the rest behind to cure when I left on vacation.

I look forward to planting even more potatoes next year. I need more space for my edibles! My biggest tip is to use a fork, which any potato article will recommend. I only had my trusty spade, so that’s what I used, but I did slice a few potatoes in half. Those ones went into a soup broth that I made and froze for future meals.

Here are a couple of pics of my beauts!

Some of the potatoes were attached to the main root. But it was like a treasure hunt sifting through the soil for the rest of them!

 

My obligatory, proud "styled" shot of my potato harvest dirt and all!

 

Zucchini “pizza” three ways

It seems if I walk away from my garden for five minutes, another zucchini will appear. My plants are very happy this year. There was no room for them in my veggie gardens, so I had to find other spots with ample space. Two I plunked in an ornamental garden beside a peony and a butterfly bush. The other two are in a new garden off my garage that has lots of sun. The soil is terrible (and full of bindweed), but I started amending it this spring with compost (and I have to weed every few days to prevent my plants from being strangled). Needless to say, both locations are producing equal amounts of zucchini.

As I started my attempt to eat through my haul (sharing some of it with friends, family and neighbours, of course), I remembered a photo someone posted to Facebook (or was it Pinterest?) last year. It was a recipe for zucchini pizza. My google search turned up a few recipes that involved the oven, but I wanted to barbecue, so I made these up. Descriptions for each are in the captions below.

The first ones I made as a side dish because I didn't know how they'd turn out. I sliced open the zucchini and hollowed out each half to remove the seeds. Then I spread tomato sauce, and sprinkled chopped peppers and cheese on top. They were delicious!

My husband wondered how they'd taste with taco meat, so that was our next zucchini meal. I fried up ground beef with taco seasoning while we barbecued the zucchini for about 20 minutes (after experimenting, I prefer to lay them on foil to prevent the skins from charring). I brought out the meat and again sprinkled cheddar and peppers on top, letting it cook for another 10 minutes. We ate it with sour cream and salsa. Perfection.

Last night, we barbecued chicken and then added the slices to the barbecuing zucchinis with red onion, peppers and goat cheese. I drizzled balsamic vinegar overtop as they cooked. Another winner!

An edible inventory and an unwelcome beetle

Last year I planted a few things in the small veggie patch that was already in the backyard when we bought the house – garlic, tomatoes, a few herbs. In the fall, my husband built a couple of raised vegetable boxes out of cedar, so after a soil delivery this spring, I was ready to plant a whole lot more. I planted so much I had to go elsewhere to find a spot for everything. It all fit eventually, but it will be interesting to see what thrives where. Because of the cool, wet spring we had, my tomatoes weren’t looking that great until the past couple of weeks. Now they’re finally taking off. I’m out there every night carefully inspecting everything. What’s that they say about a watched pot that never boils?

However it’s a good thing I’ve scrutinized my plants so closely or I wouldn’t have noticed the Colorado potato beetles (kindly ID’d by a social media follower) and their eggs and larvae attacking my tomatillos and potatoes. I’ve been hand-picking them off the leaves and drowning them in a water/dish soap mix. My fingers are crossed they won’t completely ruin my harvest.

Here is a mostly complete list of the edibles I’ve planted this year:

  • Tricolor Carrots Circus Circus (Renee’s Garden)
  • Golden Detroit Beet (Urban Harvest)
  • Radish Raxe – eaten about two weeks ago (William Dam Seeds)
  • Vates Blue Curled Kale (Urban Harvest)
  • Tomatillos (Richter’s Herbs)
  • Zucchini (unknown origins… I bought the plants on sale)
  • Bush beans from my neighbor (grown from seed)
  • Mammoth Melting Sugar Pea from Burpee’s Heirlooms collection
  • Fingerling potatoes (Urban Harvest)
  • A fig tree (from Steven Biggs)
  • A potted strawberry and blueberry plant (President’s Choice)

These radishes marked the beginning of my harvest season. They were delicious in salads. I'll be planting more in August!

My kale has already found its way into salads and the steamer!


I’ve also planted some interesting herbs:

And a bunch of tomatoes that I will list in an upcoming post!

I feel like I’m forgetting something…

Tara’s tomato diaries: The Mighty ‘Mato

This year, when I attended the President’s Choice garden preview, I not only came home with plants to trial in my garden, I also came home with a little box. Inside the box were three grafted tomatoes. Luckily they spoke about this latest innovation for home veggie gardeners at the event, so I knew what to do with them.

Three Mighty 'Matos to try! I can't wait to see how they perform.

How does the whole grafting process work? In a nutshell, a cutting of a tomato plant is attached, or grafted, to hardy rootstock. Eventually the two fuse together into one plant. The resulting plant is pest- and disease-resistant, and more tolerant of temperature swings. You don’t even have to worry about crop rotation! The other bonus? You can double your crop. The plant I saw at the event was about six feet tall!

So, with all this information in mind, I took my Mighty ‘Matos home and planted two of them in my raised beds and one in a new veggie garden I created at the side of my house. I bought the extra-large tomato cages that will support them and I was sure to avoid burying the graft, which would cancel out all the benefits mentioned above. Luckily it was easy to see where the two plants were fused together – which in itself is pretty cool!

These cages looked ridiculous when I put them in the garden (that's my husband standing beside them), but apparently the plants will need them eventually.

I can’t wait to see how these plants turn out. I’ll be sure to report back over the summer.

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