{ Archive for the ‘container gardening’ Category }

Virginia Johnson launches summer garden collection

Canadian textile designer Virginia Johnson has launched her first summer garden collection. Inspired by the outdoors, the collection includes a variety of elegant garden planters and decor accessories for both your home and garden.


Pretty planters of various shapes and sizes feature Virginia’s signature prints in an antique rustic finish. Along with yellow poppy (featured above), planters are available in an all over blue floral pattern.

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Happy National Gardening Exercise Day!

Did you know that June 6 is National Gardening Exercise Day (NGED). Not only is gardening a great way to relax and unwind, it also builds muscle and burns calories!


You might not realize the amount of good exercise you can get while working outside in your garden; container gardening, weeding, lawn care, pruning and preparing planting beds are just some of the many ways you’re staying healthy and active while outside.

In celebration of NGED, here are some great tips for staying healthy while in the garden.

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Beautiful blooms at the Toronto Flower Market

The Toronto Flower Market returned to the city this past Saturday, May 10. From beautiful bouquets of locally grown tulips and potted campanulas to mini phalaenopsis and succulents, there was lots to see and buy! With so many beautiful blooms on display, I thought I would share a few of my favourites.

{Potted campanulas, Tony’s Floral Distribution}

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Favourite flower for early spring

The Wave family (famous for bringing us the Wave petunia and pansy) has a bright new addition this spring: Blueberry Swirl Cool Wave pansies.

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Celebrate Plant a Flower Day

Did you know that today is Plant a Flower Day? I’d like to celebrate by sending these pretty plantable gift tags.

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Valentine’s Day gift idea: Garden-in-a-Bag

This charming Garden-in-a-Bag is the most clever way to give flowers this Valentine’s Day (and the blooms will last much longer than ones from the florist). Read the rest of this entry »

Ceramic artist Frances Palmer

I’ve long admired the work of potter and gardener Frances Palmer. Her one-of-a-kind handmade ceramics have beautiful, organic shapes that can stand alone, but are perhaps even lovelier when graced with spring flowers.

 

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Putting together my holiday urn

This morning the sun was shining, it was mild and the birds were singing in my weeping mulberry. I decided it was the perfect time to go outside and put together my holiday urn. The sun promptly disappeared, but I was already in the mood to create, so I didn’t care. My urn is a mix of materials I bought (though I hate paying for stuff I can find in the woods for free) and things I gathered from my yard (and garage).

Here’s a list of what went into the mix:

  • I started by cutting a birch branch I found while on a hike (it was on the ground!) in two and stuck both branches firmly in the soil that was left over from my fall urn. There’s a nice fork in one of the branches, so I’m technically following the rule of threes! I added a bit more soil to anchor them in.
  • Next, I placed my pine boughs around the exterior. This was the only greenery I purchased (I grabbed a small bunch), since I don’t have anything like this on my property.
  • I also bought sticks. But only because I don’t know where I can covertly snip red osier dogwood in these here parts. My house sits up a bit from the road and my urn could look like a big blob of green, so I wanted a pop of colour with the red sticks. I placed these around the birch branches.
  • Then I took a walk around the yard, snipping two types of cedar branches, which I interspersed with the pine boughs.
  • I wanted to add a wee bit of sparkle, so I stuck three silvery stars on sticks around the birch. I had more, but I wanted to keep it subtle.
  • I crowned the centre with three enormous pinecones that I bought at the Toronto Christmas Market last year.

And that’s it! I fiddled a bit with all the branches to make them just so, but I’m happy with the result. Here are some pics:

It took a bit of fiddling to get the branches just so. I like the pine because it drapes nicely over the sides. The one type of cedar I used is a bit more one-dimensional, so it fits nicely in between, while the other type of cedar is fuller, adding depth and a bit of height here and there.

Here you can see the contrasting greenery a little better.

And this closeup shows the silvery stars--they're not that bad, right?--in contrast with the red branches, giant pinecones and birch.

Quick project: barn wood planter

I’ve been enjoying all the great ideas for winter planters, holiday flower arrangements and wreaths that have been popping up lately. When we were down in Kalispell two weeks ago, I noticed cute barn wood planters all over the antique shops, stuffed with juniper branches. Some were long and low, some tapered and carved, but they all had one thing in common: they were ridiculously overpriced. I said to Chris, “I bet we could throw one of those together in less than an hour.”

And this morning we tried. And got two done in less than an hour.

Of course, Chris is a confident woodworker, and we have loads of old fence board just laying around. But it’s still an easy project for anyone to try.

Choose wood that has aged nicely, but be sure it isn’t so aged that it is splitting. Interesting knots or grain are a bonus. For easy building, we used plain old but joints, and made the base the width of our board, and the height the same. For the end pieces, we measured the width of our board and added the thickness of each side piece. Use a coloured pencil to mark your measurements–regular pencil disappears on barn wood.

Cut your board into the lengths you want. A mitre or table saw will give you nice straight cuts, but if you're careful, a jigsaw or circular saw will work as well.

If you want handles, use a wood boring bit (or the largest drill bit you have) to make two parallel holes on the sides.

Once you have your holes, use a jigsaw to cut out the handle shape.

Use good wood glue (carpenter's glue) on each joint. This is what really holds it together.

After you glue the joints, nail them together. We used a brad nailer, but you could use chunky-headed roofing nails to add some detail.

Chris insisted on giving the edges all a quick router. It took longer to change the bit than to do everything else together, but I must admit, it really takes it up a notch.

If you intend to use live plants, you will want to be sure to build your planter to fit your container. I chose to do a dry arrangement, but 3 standard 5 inch pots (or old sour cream containers!) will fit just right when I decide to change it.

First one done! I'll add some of those stick-on felt circles from the hardware store so it doesn't scratch the table or floor.

Here’s what I did with one of mine. I did resort to using some artificial flowers; it’s protected in the porch and I don’t want to assault my junipers or dogwoods until they get a little bigger.

 

‘Tis the season for holiday plants

With Remembrance Day behind us and Halloween firmly in the past, it is time for many of us to get into the full swing of all things Christmas.

I’ve got my poinsettia going, and my baby rosemary plants are putting on new growth. Now it’s time to try something else: forcing bulbs.

I’ve never grown an amaryllis or anything like that, but this year I thought I’d try paperwhites. I’m a die hard daffodil fan, so these cousins (Narcissus papyraceus) aren’t too far outside my comfort zone.

The little gift pack I stumbled across at Walmart for five bucks actually came with a pot and a disk of compressed coir, but many people plant the bulbs in a dish of water topped up with pebbles or marbles for stability. My kit says to plant them six weeks before you want blooms; most people on the Interweb say three weeks, so I’m doing it today and we’ll see.

I decided to ditch the coir and pot that came with the kit and do something prettier.

I put a shallow layer of stones in this (plastic-lined) dish, placed the bulbs, then covered them up to their "shoulders" in more stones and added just enough water to keep their bottoms wet.

I did find an intriguing tip for keeping blooming paperwhites from getting top-heavy –get them ever so slightly drunk. But as to why paperwhites are thought of as a Christmas flower, I couldn’t find any clues other than they bloom in December in warm climates. There doesn’t seem to be any special symbolism.

Poinsettias symbolized purity to the ancient Aztecs, and there’s the usual holly and ivy to represent eternity and resurrection. Evergreen trees fall into the same category. But amaryllis? Christmas Rose (Serissa or Helleborus, depending on who you ask)? Christmas cactus? We just seem to be looking for something alive and lovely in the dark winter months.

Fair enough. We were pretty excited when Chris got a zygocactus (Schlumbergera) blooming again.

Rosemary babies in the background!

At least, he’s the one who rescued the poor little guy. It was languishing in a corner after being relocated during the ever-present renovations, and he moved it to his studio where it gets bright, indirect light. He’s taking full credit for the transformation; I think he accidentally did exactly what it needed. 

But I’m not complaining. It’s pretty exciting to have so many things growing when there’s carols on the radio and four inches of snow.

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