{ Archive for the ‘food’ Category }

Garden to table: Delicious peach recipes

Love fresh peaches? Then you’ll love trying these delicious recipes! Perfect for everything from healthy smoothies to desserts, this yummy stone fruit is low in calories, a good source of vitamin A and C and contains fiber.

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DIY: House Plant Cupcakes

Talk about a succulent success!

When I came across these adorable house plant cupcakes by Alana Jones-Mann, I knew I had to share them. If you love miniature cacti and succulents, why not make an eye-catching edible version for your next get-together!

diy-houseplant-cupcakes-alana-jones-mann{Photo: alanajonesmann.com}

From desert to dessert, these cupcakes would be the perfect addition to a summer garden party or birthday celebration.

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6 weekend must-trys

Happy Friday! Not sure what’s on your agenda this weekend? No need to worry! From do-it-yourself projects to delicious summer recipes, here are 6 things worth adding to your weekend to-do list.

cg-blog-stone-planter{PHOTO: Joe Kim/TC Media}

1 Build a stone planter for succulents
Turn inexpensive stone slabs into a monolithic-style container for houseplants.

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healthy ingredient: blueberries

Fresh, in-season blueberries taste amazing, especially here in Canada where they’re native. In fact, Canada is the world’s largest producer of wild (lowbush) blueberries, which are grown in clean, healthy conditions.

My favourite way to use blueberries is in my breakfast smoothies. They’re filled with antioxidants, which help promote healthy aging. In addition, they contain vitamins C and E, which boost the antioxidant ability of blueberries, and they’re high in fibre. Since now’s the time to buy locally grown ones or pick them at a farm, I thought I’d share my favourite smoothie recipes featuring blueberries.

blueberry-smoothie

 

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5 healthy smoothie recipes

Craving something sweet, but want to skip the calories? A delicious and healthy smoothie is the perfect alternative. Great for breakfast on-the-go, an afternoon treat or a post workout snack.

cg-blog-smoothie

Try one (or all) of these smoothie recipes this weekend. Created by market editor, Amanda Etty they not only taste delicious, but are full of healthy ingredients.

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Garden project: Cocktail toppers

Wouldn’t you like to make these DIY herb ring drink toppers created by the talented staff at Terrain. Using sprigs from your windowsill herb garden, you can easily fashion these to grace your winter cocktails.

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Gardening resolutions for 2014

The new year is upon us, and goal setting comes to mind — though for me, what mostly comes to mind is all the past resolutions I’ve made and then abandoned by the following January 6th. As a result of the ensuing guilt, I have actually resolved to reject resolutions of the New Year kind. I tend to set some goals at the beginning of the school year, as that is a fresh start for me more than this time of year, and sometimes my birthday gets me thinking about them.

But I have come up with a list of gardening resolutions for this year. With it being winter and all, and the actual implementation of these goals is safely located in the hazy future, it seems like a good time to commit myself to unlikely outcomes.

So here it goes.

1. I declare serious war on my weeds. Quackgrass? I’m looking at you. I am stockpiling cardboard for smothering and investing in a wholelota black plastic. I realize I’ll never eradicate weeds — they’re a fact of life, especially in my agricultural location — but I’m getting the upper hand this season. You can come and hear all about my strategies at the Calgary Horticultural Society Garden Show this spring.

2. I’m pretty good already at growing what we eat, and eating what we grow. But this year I want to grow a little extra and take it to the local food bank. Most food banks and soup kitchens appreciate this kind of donation; check with one close to you or visit Plant a Row, Grow a Row.

3. I promise to put in an apple tree this spring. I’ve been talking about it for years, I have the spot and the cultivar chosen, I’ve just got to do it. Trees need years to get established, so it’s worth putting money into them early. I know this. I have practised this. But I have been nervous about the apple because of the tricky weather we have–unpredictable frosts, winter thaws, high winds. It’s time to cross my fingers and plant.

4. Finally, I’d like to try growing sweet potatoes this year.

Pretty reasonable list, right? We’ll see how reasonable it feels come, oh, May long weekend. But now that I’ve voiced these goals to the internet world, I’m accountable. No chance to forget these like a well intentioned gym membership.

I think a garden exploded in my kitchen

Ah, the beautiful, bountiful, overwhelming grasp of harvest time.

It began, for us, when a neighbour begged us to come take the last of her ever-bearing strawberries (and some runners while we were at it). Then the squash arrived from another neighbour, along with some overgrown cucumbers, which I quickly dispatched into relish.

Then came the apples. And more cucumbers.

Pickles and applesauce waiting to happen.

Then I brought in beets, and more zucchini–which I thought I was staying on top off but apparently wasn’t– and look! Tomatoes, which I thought hated me, are growing for me this year in abundance.

 

Oh, did I forget to mention I have four cases of pears ripening slowly in the corner? Well, I do.

She loves 'em, but even she can't eat them all.

The canning jars are filling and the dehydrator is running.

Tomorrow, I’m picking chokecherries and my four cases of peaches arrive.

I need my head examined.

 

 

 

 

Ever heard of a huckleberry?

Other than the famous Finn, I had never heard of a huckleberry until I moved to southern Alberta. Apparently it’s an appellation given to many small fruits, Solanum melanocerasum (garden huckleberry) being one of the more common (a cousin to tomatoes and potatoes). However, if you hear ‘huckleberry’ around these parts, chances are it’s not the nightshade that’s being referred to, but one of the Vaccinium species which grow wild here.

I had not so much as even tasted a huckleberry when my friend Tina invited me to come picking with her at the Castle Mountain Huckleberry Festival. Yes, an entire festival for huckleberries. I had no idea.

They look a lot like blueberries, but taste more like a saskatoon. (And you need to know what those are too.)

It’s held at the local ski hill, with music, food, the whole deal. They even sell lift tickets so you can pick from the top of the mountain all the way down.

Say hi Tina! The reddish foliage you can see are the huckleberry bushes.

Part of our haul. We baked them up in a fruit crisp, which disappeared too quickly for me to take pictures.

We heard from other more seasoned pickers that the crop was not as plentiful this year as most, but we still had a good time. It’s got me thinking about growing some Solanum melanocerasum to see how they compare, and so I could have them right here without the trip and the hike. But at the same time, isn’t the hunt part of the fun?

 

 

Zucchini “pizza” three ways

It seems if I walk away from my garden for five minutes, another zucchini will appear. My plants are very happy this year. There was no room for them in my veggie gardens, so I had to find other spots with ample space. Two I plunked in an ornamental garden beside a peony and a butterfly bush. The other two are in a new garden off my garage that has lots of sun. The soil is terrible (and full of bindweed), but I started amending it this spring with compost (and I have to weed every few days to prevent my plants from being strangled). Needless to say, both locations are producing equal amounts of zucchini.

As I started my attempt to eat through my haul (sharing some of it with friends, family and neighbours, of course), I remembered a photo someone posted to Facebook (or was it Pinterest?) last year. It was a recipe for zucchini pizza. My google search turned up a few recipes that involved the oven, but I wanted to barbecue, so I made these up. Descriptions for each are in the captions below.

The first ones I made as a side dish because I didn't know how they'd turn out. I sliced open the zucchini and hollowed out each half to remove the seeds. Then I spread tomato sauce, and sprinkled chopped peppers and cheese on top. They were delicious!

My husband wondered how they'd taste with taco meat, so that was our next zucchini meal. I fried up ground beef with taco seasoning while we barbecued the zucchini for about 20 minutes (after experimenting, I prefer to lay them on foil to prevent the skins from charring). I brought out the meat and again sprinkled cheddar and peppers on top, letting it cook for another 10 minutes. We ate it with sour cream and salsa. Perfection.

Last night, we barbecued chicken and then added the slices to the barbecuing zucchinis with red onion, peppers and goat cheese. I drizzled balsamic vinegar overtop as they cooked. Another winner!

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