{ Archive for the ‘fruit and vegetable gardening’ Category }

Garden to table: Delicious peach recipes

Love fresh peaches? Then you’ll love trying these delicious recipes! Perfect for everything from healthy smoothies to desserts, this yummy stone fruit is low in calories, a good source of vitamin A and C and contains fiber.

cg-blog-peaches Read the rest of this entry »

Growing trend: Fruit and vegetable moulds

Anyone with a fruit or vegetable garden is probably well aware that sometimes during the growing period crops can take on a mind of their own. 3-in-1 strawberries, funny looking carrots or misshaped zucchini are all normal occurrences. These shapes can happen unintentionally, but what if you had the ability to grow your best bounty in fun and interesting shapes on purpose.

Developed in China, specially designed plastic moulds are used to transform fruits and vegetables into a variety of shapes. From heart-shaped watermelons and star-shaped English cucumbers to even these Buddha-shaped pears.

cg-blog-fruit-mould-pear-2

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6 weekend must-trys

Happy Friday! Not sure what’s on your agenda this weekend? No need to worry! From do-it-yourself projects to delicious summer recipes, here are 6 things worth adding to your weekend to-do list.

cg-blog-stone-planter{PHOTO: Joe Kim/TC Media}

1 Build a stone planter for succulents
Turn inexpensive stone slabs into a monolithic-style container for houseplants.

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healthy ingredient: blueberries

Fresh, in-season blueberries taste amazing, especially here in Canada where they’re native. In fact, Canada is the world’s largest producer of wild (lowbush) blueberries, which are grown in clean, healthy conditions.

My favourite way to use blueberries is in my breakfast smoothies. They’re filled with antioxidants, which help promote healthy aging. In addition, they contain vitamins C and E, which boost the antioxidant ability of blueberries, and they’re high in fibre. Since now’s the time to buy locally grown ones or pick them at a farm, I thought I’d share my favourite smoothie recipes featuring blueberries.

blueberry-smoothie

 

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5 healthy smoothie recipes

Craving something sweet, but want to skip the calories? A delicious and healthy smoothie is the perfect alternative. Great for breakfast on-the-go, an afternoon treat or a post workout snack.

cg-blog-smoothie

Try one (or all) of these smoothie recipes this weekend. Created by market editor, Amanda Etty they not only taste delicious, but are full of healthy ingredients.

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Healthy ingredient: strawberries

It’s strawberry season here in Ontario, which means I’ll be eating my weight in these ruby red fruits. While you may love them for their deliciously sweet flavour, make no mistake, strawberries are among the best foods for you.

HealthyIngredient_Strawberries

Why we love strawberries: They rival citrus fruits for vitamin C content, and are packed with antioxidants, too. Anthocyanins are potent antioxidants that give strawberries their vivid red colour, help reduce inflammation and may also curb the growth of cancer cells. They’re low in calories and high in fibre, folate and potassium.

How to use them: Look for organic berries that are red all the way to the tip, a sign that they’re fully ripe (strawberries don’t ripen after picking). Beware of mould: It spreads quickly from berry to berry. If you’re not using your strawberries immediately, look through the container and pick out any spoiled ones. Plan to eat the berries within a day or two.
Although strawberries taste best when they’re in season, freezing them preserves their freshness to use year-round. To freeze, wash whole berries, remove the leafy portion on top and pat the berries dry. Spread them out on a baking sheet and freeze until solid. Transfer to a sealable glass container.

P.S. Tips for growing strawberries.
P.P.S. An energizing strawberry shake.

Join Canadian Gardening at the 2014 Toronto Flower Market!

The Toronto Flower Market returns to the city this Saturday, May 10. Debuting at its new location in the heart of Queen West (1056 Queen St. W. between Ossington and Dovercourt), this outdoor flower and plant market brings stalls of bright blooms to the city just in time for Mother’s Day.

{Illustration by Courtney Wotherspoon}

To help celebrate the start of its 2014 season, Canadian Gardening will be participating in the festivities and we’re inviting you to join, too!
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Finding a home for the apple tree

One of my New Year’s resolutions, subcategory: gardening, is to finally put in my apple tree. I chose, quite a long while ago, the Prairie Sensation apple developed at the University of Saskatchewan as the best fit for my location and tastes. Now the big question: where to put it.

It may seem backwards, as many of you would consider a particular spot and then choose something to fit it. I use that approach frequently as well. But I am in that enviable position of having enough land that I can pick a tree first, and ask questions later. Not that I buy plants willy-nilly, or put no thought into their needs; I just have a property large enough that I have several options for any given plant I decide might enjoy my garden.

Any of you small-plot gardeners growing green with envy right now are welcome to come help me mow and weed this summer.

Now. If you would be so kind to offer some opinions, here is a rough drawing of our property, completely not to scale, to give you an idea of my options.

Existing trees in green, crabapple in yellow, fence lines etcetera in grey, you get the idea.

Location A: my original plan. Full sun; little bit of shade late in the day from the house. Well protected from prevailing west winds, somewhat from northerly. Snow collects here to protect the tree from freeze/thaw cycles. Frost tends to pool lower to the east, and there’s the crabapple nearby for cross pollination.  In view from the house and street for optimal blossom enjoyment. Down side: Really close to property line. What if whomever buys the neighbouring lot (it’s for sale now) does not want errant apples?

Location B: There’s lots of room in this back quarter of the property, but no wind protection–at least not until the evergreens and ash get a little more size on them. Full sun, all day, but kind of far from the crab, though if we go with one idea and build up a little orchard back here, that wouldn’t be a problem.

Location C: Another area that could become a little orchard. Kind of far away from the house, though. Again, the wind protection and pollination issues, potentially resolvable, but this is a low spot and I think it would turn out to be a frost pocket.

So really, it’s probably a choice between A: picturesque with the stone walkway, but some shade and potential neighbour nagging; or B: work towards the orchard and grow that windbreak.

Please, help me decide!

 

Who cares about soil temperature?

The snow is melting, the cows are calving, and the calendar looks right, but for me, I know it’s really spring because I can smell it. I hope you know what I mean: that earthy, damp scent that’s starting to waft around when the sun is bright. So exciting! Time to grow things! Whip out those seed packets and let’s start digging, right?
Unfortunately, no. At least not outside. Not yet.
I had to learn to curb my enthusiasm the hard way: losing more than a few seeds. Some years I was sure it was frost. Other years it was obvious they had been rotted out from too much rain. Or maybe I’d planted some old or bad seed to begin with. But the main culprit went unidentified until I started hanging out with farmers.
When growing things is not just a hobby but your livelihood, you pay extra attention to some details an average gardener may be clueless about. Such as soil temperature.
You may have heard people talking about the soil “warming up,” maybe referring to how raised beds warm up quicker, allowing earlier planting. They aren’t just talking about the dirt “thawing,” as any farmer can tell you: there are ideal temperatures for the germination of different crops, and if the soil is too cool, you end up with uneven growth or damaged seed, and those depressing blank spots in your rows.
When I learned this, I looked back and realized this was why some years I could get away with planting earlier–the mild spring had fast forwarded the soil warming–and some years even mid-May plantings were sluggish in the cool damp.
So as much as you’d like to dig in, don’t be in too much of a rush. This time of year, you’re probably just wasting your time. Better to use your enthusiasm indoors.

Gardener’s bookshelf: help with veggies

I love flowers as much as the next girl, but when it comes to gardening, I got into it for the food. Pretty didn’t matter. I’ve come to see the error of my ways, but no matter how many flowers I now grow, my green heart still really belongs to the edibles. As such, I am always on the look out for new insight on growing better vegetables. Read the rest of this entry »

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