{ Archive for the ‘garden design’ Category }

While you’re waiting… plant some of these! (Part 1)

In my penultimate look at perennials that bridge the gap between spring and summer, I recommend some superb flowers that are tailor-made for carrying your garden through the seasonal transition until the main glut of coreopsis, daylilies, echinacea, hydrangeas, garden phlox and Shasta daisies open their blooms as the mercury soars during the dog days of summer.

Amsonia-2014-06-19-19.24
Read the rest of this entry »

Four more early summer bridging plants

I’ve been looking back at some of the garden pictures I’ve taken over the past month or so, and in particular at the plants and shrubs that bloom after the spring glut, but before main season summer-flowering species take over during the hottest part of the year. These are useful “bridging plants” that prevent flower beds from looking empty as one season gives way to another.

In fact, they’re so useful for maintaining a steady stream of flowers that I intend to bulk up my stocks for next year, beginning with Mayapples:

cg-blog-mayapple-2014
Taking over nicely from springtime hepaticas, trilliums and Jack-in-the-pulpits are our native Mayapples (Podophyllum peltatum, Zone 4) which produce fragrant white blooms underneath their leafy green “umbrellas.” I grow them in full shade in moist, humus-rich soil where they spend the summer with various ferns and monkshoods; dryer soils will result in plants going dormant in midsummer. Spreading slowly via underground rhizomes (or stems), any unwanted plants are easy to pull out.

Read the rest of this entry »

Living Mulches: Two Great Groundcovers for Shade

One of my favourite groundcovers for shade is sweet woodruff (Galium odoratum, Zone 3) which spreads slowly but surely via short underground rhizomes. It bears fragrant cymes of star-shaped white flowers for several weeks in early summer, and while its spread may be indefinite, it rarely grows taller than 10 centimetres. Even when not in flower, sweet woodruff remains attractive with its circular whorls of leaves that hug the ground and provide the perfect backdrop for larger plants.

cg-blog-galium-odoratum-002

Read the rest of this entry »

Virginia Johnson launches summer garden collection

Canadian textile designer Virginia Johnson has launched her first summer garden collection. Inspired by the outdoors, the collection includes a variety of elegant garden planters and decor accessories for both your home and garden.


Pretty planters of various shapes and sizes feature Virginia’s signature prints in an antique rustic finish. Along with yellow poppy (featured above), planters are available in an all over blue floral pattern.

Read the rest of this entry »

Transitioning from late spring to early summer

It’s with a certain sadness that I bid adieu to the last daffodils to bloom in my garden. Known botanically as Narcissus poeticus var. recurvus (Zone 4), they bear flowers with small, red-rimmed golden cups (or coronas) that are surrounded by pure white recurved petals (known as perianth segments). Native to Switzerland and commonly called “old pheasant’s eye”, their blossoms are deliciously fragrant, and a perfect example of a genus going out with a bang rather than a whimper.

Apart from Switzerland, one of the best places to see old pheasant’s eye growing wild is in northern England, up to the Scottish Borders where—in a climate not unlike that of their homeland—they have naturalised over hundreds of years, and now cover entire hillsides. All you have to do is follow your nose, as you’re likely to smell their sweet scent before actually clapping eyes on their breathtaking flowers en masse. They’ll naturalise in Canada too (albeit more slowly), providing you let them set seed and allow their leaves to mature.

Read the rest of this entry »

Toronto garden tour: Through the Garden Gate

What are your plans for Father’s Day weekend? If you live in or are visiting Toronto, check out Through the Garden Gate. This annual tour is put on by the Toronto Botanical Garden (TBG) and showcases of some of the city’s most beautiful private gardens.

Read the rest of this entry »

Celebrate Garden Days

Looking for something fun to do with the gardening enthusiast in your life? How about celebrating Garden Days!

Organized by the Canadian Garden Council, Garden Days is a three-day event in celebration of National Garden Day. From June 13 to 15, green-thumbs of all ages can enjoy a variety of activities hosted by local gardens, garden centres, horticultural organizations and garden-related businesses in their city.
Read the rest of this entry »

Beautiful blooms at the Toronto Flower Market

The Toronto Flower Market returned to the city this past Saturday, May 10. From beautiful bouquets of locally grown tulips and potted campanulas to mini phalaenopsis and succulents, there was lots to see and buy! With so many beautiful blooms on display, I thought I would share a few of my favourites.

{Potted campanulas, Tony’s Floral Distribution}

Read the rest of this entry »

Follow Friday: Fashion Illustrator Grace Ciao

Like any other instagram-aholic, I love finding new and creative accounts to follow. So, when I came across a talented fashion illustrator and her unique use for beautiful blooms, I immediately hit “follow” (and you should, too!).

Toga Jumpsuit
{Image: Grace Ciao}

Read the rest of this entry »

Bookworm: Five-Plant Gardens by Nancy J. Ondra

If you’re a gardening newbie and haven’t a clue where to start, pick up Nancy J. Ondra’s Five Plant Gardens: 52 Ways to Grow a Perennial Garden with Just Five Plants. Gardening expert Ondra provides 52 easy-to-execute garden plans, each using five well-considered plants that grow nicely together.

Read the rest of this entry »

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 Next