{ Archive for the ‘garden design’ Category }

Transitioning from late spring to early summer

It’s with a certain sadness that I bid adieu to the last daffodils to bloom in my garden. Known botanically as Narcissus poeticus var. recurvus (Zone 4), they bear flowers with small, red-rimmed golden cups (or coronas) that are surrounded by pure white recurved petals (known as perianth segments). Native to Switzerland and commonly called “old pheasant’s eye”, their blossoms are deliciously fragrant, and a perfect example of a genus going out with a bang rather than a whimper.

Apart from Switzerland, one of the best places to see old pheasant’s eye growing wild is in northern England, up to the Scottish Borders where—in a climate not unlike that of their homeland—they have naturalised over hundreds of years, and now cover entire hillsides. All you have to do is follow your nose, as you’re likely to smell their sweet scent before actually clapping eyes on their breathtaking flowers en masse. They’ll naturalise in Canada too (albeit more slowly), providing you let them set seed and allow their leaves to mature.

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Toronto garden tour: Through the Garden Gate

What are your plans for Father’s Day weekend? If you live in or are visiting Toronto, check out Through the Garden Gate. This annual tour is put on by the Toronto Botanical Garden (TBG) and showcases of some of the city’s most beautiful private gardens.

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Celebrate Garden Days

Looking for something fun to do with the gardening enthusiast in your life? How about celebrating Garden Days!

Organized by the Canadian Garden Council, Garden Days is a three-day event in celebration of National Garden Day. From June 13 to 15, green-thumbs of all ages can enjoy a variety of activities hosted by local gardens, garden centres, horticultural organizations and garden-related businesses in their city.
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Beautiful blooms at the Toronto Flower Market

The Toronto Flower Market returned to the city this past Saturday, May 10. From beautiful bouquets of locally grown tulips and potted campanulas to mini phalaenopsis and succulents, there was lots to see and buy! With so many beautiful blooms on display, I thought I would share a few of my favourites.

{Potted campanulas, Tony’s Floral Distribution}

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Follow Friday: Fashion Illustrator Grace Ciao

Like any other instagram-aholic, I love finding new and creative accounts to follow. So, when I came across a talented fashion illustrator and her unique use for beautiful blooms, I immediately hit “follow” (and you should, too!).

Toga Jumpsuit
{Image: Grace Ciao}

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Bookworm: Five-Plant Gardens by Nancy J. Ondra

If you’re a gardening newbie and haven’t a clue where to start, pick up Nancy J. Ondra’s Five Plant Gardens: 52 Ways to Grow a Perennial Garden with Just Five Plants. Gardening expert Ondra provides 52 easy-to-execute garden plans, each using five well-considered plants that grow nicely together.

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Sneak Preview: Gardiner in Bloom exhibition

Celebrate spring in the city with the Gardiner Museum‘s Spring Awakening: Gardiner in Bloom exhibition.

Featuring a collection of large-scale floral installations by six Toronto designers, the exhibit combines the beauty of spring blooms and the museum’s permanent collections. Yesterday, I was lucky enough to be invited for a behind-the-scenes look at the exhibit. While designers hung branches, positioned flowers and placed moss I managed to snap a few pictures of these one-of-a-kind creations.

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Gardener’s bookshelf: Bonnie Trust Dahan

One of the joys of keeping a garden for me is being able to surround myself with the beauty of nature, and not just when I’m out of doors: I love incorporating plants, flowers, and natural objects into my interior decor as well. If I’m in the mood for inspiration minus the pesky details of how, when, and how much, there are two lovely volumes on my shelves from Chronicle Books that fit the bill beautifully: Garden House and Living with the Seasons, both produced by Bonnie Trust Dahan with photography by Shaun (or Sean) Sullivan.

Part of the gardening section of my library… yes, just part...

One of Sean Sullivan's gorgeous photos from Garden House. The flash glare is mine, not his.

Both are over a decade old, but I still find them lovely and worthy of study. There are touches of modernism, country, and Asian design influences, but because everything is focused on the natural plants and objects, the ideas tend to be timeless rather than fit any particular trend. Primarily pictures with minimal commentary, you will find no real ‘how-to’ spreads.  However, each turn of the page offers something to admire or contemplate, even if it’s a simple tableaux of ordinary objects, made beautiful simply by us being reminded to notice them.

Indeed, both these books invite contemplation of the simple sights, smells, and textures that nature offers, and the simple joys these experiences can bring to the everyday. It is a true pleasure to use Dahan’s books as a springboard for my own ideas in enhancing the beauty and joy of my home and garden.

P.S. A third book, Garden Home City, explores the same territory, viewed through the lens of city life.

P.S.S. If you missed the inaugural Gardener’s Bookshelf post, you can read it here.

 

Garden friends come out of the shed

The flowers are slow this spring. It may have something to do with the weekly blizzards all the way through the month of April, but whatever: finally it’s May! And while I can’t be bothered to build a Maypole, I decided to celebrate by pulling some of my garden decorations out of the shed and choosing them new spots for the year.

I’m thinking I’ve got enough little critters (such as the ones below) and it’s time to think about some bigger, permanent art. I’ve got all kinds of projects swimming in my brain, and there’s even more ideas here.  I’d love to have an interesting hunk of architectural salvage in my garden (Garden of Ruins at Guildwood Park Toronto, anyone?) but I’m still a sucker for the cheap resin creations at the garden centre. Especially fairies and dragons.

I found this cute snail at Extra Foods (Loblaws) last year. He has settled down in front of my golden flowering currant.

This little lady actually made it through the winter snuggled up to this Blue Star juniper. Loblaws a few years back.

Some of my best garden art pieces were found at the thrift store. This Asian couple on a raft will be taking up residence in the dry riverbed… as soon as I dig it.

This little guy came home with me for 25 cents. He’s supervising the daffodils that we planted last fall. Ornamental hops coming up in the back.
Joining the family this year: from Greengate Garden Centre in Calgary, the silly whirligig ladybug!

 

Gardening gizmos for the techy-types

As promised, I’ve been experimenting with a bunch of gardening apps on my iPad this week. Here’s the ones I tried, and what I thought of them. All available on the App Store; sorry Androidians, I can’t help you, but comment if you can help each other! Click on the images to see the details and screenshots for each app.

Toolkit HD, Applied Objects, $3.99

This is a slick, easy to use little package, an everything-in-one-place tool for to-do lists, your garden diary, and plant lists. Lots of nice features, like being able to tag your diary entries so you can go back and find your notes about the last time you pruned that apple tree, and making a plant list for your particular garden or gardens (up to four separate ones) with details such as when they were planted and when they will mature/bloom.  It gives advice based on your hardiness zone, but the plant lists (which I found on the limited side anyway) don’t adjust to your zone. You can add custom plants with pictures, along with all their sun/water/soil/temperature info, but they aren’t added to the main (search-able) plant list.  The Glossary is pretty good, a little simplistic maybe, but it links to Wikipedia if you want more info.  This strikes me as a great starting place for a beginning gardener who wants to be more organized, or the more advanced gardener if they’re looking more for record keeping.

 

Eden Garden Designer, Herbaceous Software, $1.99

This is a fun little app that is very visual, whereas Toolkit is very list-oriented. You can choose an imaginary background, or load a picture of your own landscape, and then fill it with plants, rearrange the plants, look at what would be blooming at certain times of year… you can even control the amount of wind and insects! It’s a great little gardening fix mid-winter or mid-city. That said, the plant lists are somewhat simplistic. There’s just “hosta”, no varieties or anything, and the plant choices are limited (you can buy additional groups of plants for $0.99). So as far as using this for designing, it’s great for generating ideas and getting a general idea for how things might look, but it won’t get you anywhere with detailed planning. Still, a fun little program.

 

LawnCAD, Nathan French, $4.99

This is a compact little Computer-Aided Drafting app that will likely appeal to the planners and math brains out there. I’ve never used a CAD program other than this, so I can’t really compare it or speak about its usefulness on a professional level, but as a layman I’m loving the interface, the preciseness, and the itty-bitty power trip that comes from building and erasing entire landscapes in one swipe. Warning: you must love nit-picky details to love this app.

 

Grow Planner, Growing Interactive, $9.99

A little more expensive than most, this app is really a case of you get what you pay for. Provided by the well-respected Mother Earth News, this app does everything but put the seeds in the ground. You draw the size and shape of the beds you want, choose the veggies, herbs, and flowers you want to grow (right down to the variety–it’s linked to all the best known seed catalogues) and it tracks how many plants should fit in that space, when they should be planted, when they should be harvested, and when the bed will be ready for succesion planting. You can choose traditional rows or square foot gardening. If you use it multiple seasons, it tracks what was where what year so you can ensure good crop rotation. Make notes, research varieties, tweak your frost dates, add custom plants. It will even email you planting reminders if you want. If you grow vegetables, you will love this app.

 

 

And now, just for fun:

Plants Vs. Zombies, PopCap, $0.99 (iPad version)

This is a ridiculously addicting game in which your garden plants defend your home from invading zombies. I know, ridiculous, right? But oh so fun.

 

 Happy Little Farmer, GiggleUp Kids Apps and Educational Games, $1.99

This is a gorgeous little game involving planting, caring for, and harvesting crops around the farm. My kids from 3 through 8 love it, and even my twelve year old can’t help watching. The motions are simple and the directions clear, and there are all kinds of cute little hidden surprises. An absolutely stellar game for little people.

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