{ Archive for the ‘garden gifts’ Category }

Virginia Johnson launches summer garden collection

Canadian textile designer Virginia Johnson has launched her first summer garden collection. Inspired by the outdoors, the collection includes a variety of elegant garden planters and decor accessories for both your home and garden.


Pretty planters of various shapes and sizes feature Virginia’s signature prints in an antique rustic finish. Along with yellow poppy (featured above), planters are available in an all over blue floral pattern.

Read the rest of this entry »

Celebrate Garden Days

Looking for something fun to do with the gardening enthusiast in your life? How about celebrating Garden Days!

Organized by the Canadian Garden Council, Garden Days is a three-day event in celebration of National Garden Day. From June 13 to 15, green-thumbs of all ages can enjoy a variety of activities hosted by local gardens, garden centres, horticultural organizations and garden-related businesses in their city.
Read the rest of this entry »

Beautiful blooms at the Toronto Flower Market

The Toronto Flower Market returned to the city this past Saturday, May 10. From beautiful bouquets of locally grown tulips and potted campanulas to mini phalaenopsis and succulents, there was lots to see and buy! With so many beautiful blooms on display, I thought I would share a few of my favourites.

{Potted campanulas, Tony’s Floral Distribution}

Read the rest of this entry »

Springtime gift giving

I’m kind of excited about this little surprise I’ve got ready for my sister’s birthday next week, and I thought I’d show it off as maybe you would like to do something similar. Although that pretty much means the end of the surprise. Happy Birthday, Jenni!

Step one: choose a pretty bowl or vase.  I found one with a cable-knit design, because Jenni’s an extraordinary knitter. If you’re thinking Easter, a cute flower bowl such as one of these might do nicely.

Step two: fill it with goodies! I know what you’re thinking: chocolate! But we are gardeners, and of course, we are not swayed by such mundane things as chocolate. Goodies equals seeds!

Be sure to match your seed choices with the right person. Not everyone wants to baby a finicky flower; a seasoned veteran might welcome the challenge. I’ve got a bunch of seed that’s been harvested by myself or friends which I wanted to share with my sister, but you could just as easily use packets of commercial seed. Bonus for that route: instructions included! I’m not worried about Jenni having instructions; a landscape design/arbourculture degree, her, and Google make a pretty good team.

But instructions or no, go for making things pretty. Find some cool paper (keep it lightweight for easy folding),scissors, and some ribbon, stickers, decorative tape, or twine. Fancy pens optional.

I’m recycling my paper from an old printer’s sample book and a desk calendar. If you are packaging saved seed, make sure to fold each side over a few times to keep the seeds from escaping. If you feel like getting right into it, try making decorative envelopes like these – just be sure all edges are sealed. If you’re using prepackaged, all they need is a pretty wrapper.

 

Here's one way to do it -- I folded the long sides in first.

Then tuck all your little packets of goodness into the bowl, with a couple of other little trinkets that suit the season or the recipient: pussy willows, a notebook…

Oh, all right, you might as well throw some really good chocolate in there while you’re at it. If you must.

 

Celebrate Plant a Flower Day

Did you know that today is Plant a Flower Day? I’d like to celebrate by sending these pretty plantable gift tags.

Read the rest of this entry »

Planting seeds for Valentine’s

I haven’t been quite with it the last couple of weeks — working more than usual, bit of a cold, plain old cabin fever — and I’ll admit: Valentine’s Day snuck up on me a bit.

I’m scrambling for treats for school parties. We had a mad valentine-signing session last night. And, to my shame, I did not have the foresight to create any of these super fancy arrangements.

Hubby’s in town as we speak though, so if he happens to bring a certain something home, I could try one out. Or he could save me the time and find one of these Garden-in-a-Bag flowers. Just about my speed right now.

But even though I have done nothing this week in the flower department, my preschooler is ready to roll. We picked out these Disney Fairies valentines, which come with little paper shapes embedded with flower seeds.

See the little red flower pot on the card at the bottom right? Seed paper!

Way cooler (at least to me) than the current trend of throwing more candy at each other. Down side: the package gives no indication of what type of seeds you are planting. Up side: lots of leftover paper bits after the shapes were punched out. Little Miss can’t wait to plant them. She’ll be bugging me all weekend to dig out the potting soil.

Which leads me to the other up side: I’ve got spider plant babies rooting on the kitchen counter that are ready to pot, and I’ve been wanting to start some early seeds (leeks, specifically).

I think my Miniature Motivator just turned Valentine’s Day into a planting party. Share the love.

Ceramic artist Frances Palmer

I’ve long admired the work of potter and gardener Frances Palmer. Her one-of-a-kind handmade ceramics have beautiful, organic shapes that can stand alone, but are perhaps even lovelier when graced with spring flowers.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

DIY holiday gift idea: Terrarium ornaments

I first discovered air plants at the Tropical Expressions booth at Canada Blooms a few years ago. I was fascinated that they do not require soil, and I learned that air plants collect water from the rain. They also attach themselves to and derive nutrients from other plants (though they’re not considered parasitic).

I incorporated air plants into an article about quick and easy holiday terrariums for Canadian Living‘s January 2013 issue. Because of their minimal care requirements, air plants can be popped into one of those clear, plastic or glass ornaments you can purchase at craft stores. I also created another option, which involved planting succulents in a larger glass ornament. All the how-to information can be found in the Crafts section on CanadianLiving.com.

These ornaments make great gifts, but be sure to make a few for yourself!


photo by Joe Kim/TC Media

Hostess gift idea: Rosemary tree

A rosemary tree makes for a festive hostess gift, don’t you think? Its conical shape resembles a miniature Christmas tree (although its boughs aren’t sturdy enough to hang ornaments off of) and its fragrance is just so herby and delightful.

Read the rest of this entry »

Ruminations on the gardening gift

There’s a whole lot of whispering and sneaking and wrapping going on around here, and I can’t help but hope someone heard my loud hints about getting me some new secateurs. However, there’s a piece of me that hopes they didn’t notice. Why the conflict? I want someone to get them for me, so I don’t have to dither any longer about justifying the expense, but I’d really like to pick them out myself.

I’m horrible. I know. I should just be grateful, no matter what. And I’m pretty good about that when it comes to most things– get me a scarf, or a book, some music, or a fairy for my collection, and I am pretty much guaranteed to be genuinely grateful. But garden tools or garden decor can be such a matter of personal taste and needs. Not everyone wants a grinning resin turtle to cavort among the flowers. You’d better know your recipient pretty well before you go there.

Don’t get me wrong, I’d be pleased to receive many of the gifts on this lovely new list, but I’d be just as happy–maybe more–to get a gift card for my favourite greenhouse. They might carry a hint of cop-out, but in this case, and my case, it would be welcome.

If you’re set on giving a gardening gift, but the person “has everything,” is a little picky (like me), or you’re just plain drawing a blank, there’s always the option of a gift in kind: a donation to Plan Canada or World Vision (among others) can help plant fruit trees, start a quinoa crop, set up a family farm, or establish a schoolyard garden in developing parts of the world.

Anything given with love and thought is a great present, right?

Just don’t buy me any of these.

 

 

 

 

Pages: 1 2 Next