{ Archive for the ‘garden photography’ Category }

The birds prove me wrong

My husband Chris is forever making stuff. He went on a streak a couple of years back making birdhouses out of re-purposed barn wood.

I warned him about getting too crazy with the size and shape of the openings, because I had read that different species of bird could be quite particular about that. He ignored me.

They were very popular and he’s sold most of them now; there are a few in our trees that he put up last year, but I didn’t think of them as anything but decorative because smartypants me knows that no bird would actually take a chance on these crazy things.

Particularly eyebrow raising was an old broken guitar he put up, minus the strings, for a laugh.

Well, wouldn’t you know it, all of these birdhouses have occupants.

Here are the starlings that have taken up residence in the guitar:

I realize these pictures will not have National Geographic ringing me up anytime soon... taken through the glass from the living room.

 

I should probably wash my windows

And there are some camera-shy little yellow finches hanging out in here:

Between these guys, the sparrows, doves, jays and the ubiquitous robins, our yard is downright noisy these days. I couldn’t have been more wrong. And I’m okay with that.

garden eye spy: spheres of daisies

I can’t wait to see delicate little blooms start to peek through the earth — can you? “Spring has sprung” is a wonderful saying and something that I am aching to experience again. Until then, these sweet little spheres will have to see us through the rest of the chilly snow! (Does anyone know what they are called by the way? I haven’t been able to find out!)

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB Creative  or via Twitter.)

garden eye spy: yellow nostalgia

As the days begin to get a little warmer once again I find myself craving more than ever bright, vibrant bursts of colour. So away to a florist’s I went this past weekend in search of cheerful, sunshine like blooms and this is what I found.
Just the sight of this pretty petaled poesy made me infinitely happier. Is there a particular colour that always stands out in the garden for you? I’d love to know!

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB Creative  or via Twitter.)

garden eye spy: winter berries

It is always a treat to stumble upon some bright colour in the garden, especially when trying to muddle through the overreaching presence of grey during the winter months.
These berries were a welcome surprise over the weekend while out for a meandering walk. The only downside, of course, is that they make me miss summer. What other lovely colours have you seen this winter?

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB Creative  or via Twitter.)

Garden eye spy: Nature’s patterns

We talk a lot about colour in this photo column, mostly because nature offers us an endless supply of hues to be enthralled by. However, another thrilling aspect of the natural world that should not be overlooked is pattern.
Take a moment and admire the textures and patterns present on the leaves of many common plants. They often look like a miniature seamstress has been hard at work, weaving together fine lines and beautiful colours. This leafy specimen reminded me of an intricate tapestry. What are some of your favourite colours and patterns to see in nature?

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB {words + photos}  or via Twitter.)

Garden eye spy: Raindrops

Winter is almost here, but before our little corner of the globe becomes blanketed with thick white snow I thought I would share one final fall photo. These beautiful little rain drops caught my eye while out on an afternoon fall stroll.
They reminded me of tiny glass pearls and the way they decorated the vibrant leafy presence of a humble flowering cabbage made me smile. Fall is always a comforting time of year, rain and all, because it makes me feel cozy. Do you enjoy rainy days? Will you miss rainy days or are you ready for full on snowfall?

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB {words + photos})

Welcome, winter

The bulbs are in the ground, the hoses are put away, the cold frame is tucked in with leaves.

See you next year!

View out our front window.

Laurel leaf willows in the morning sun.

Mountain ash ready for a snooze.

Who's been visiting the bird house?

Asparagus fronds are gorgeous in the frost.

Garden eye spy: Magnificent mums

Aren’t mums delightful? I think other than the happy-go-lucky daisy, they are my favourite flower. They always look welcoming and cheerful. Of course, the fact that they are available in a wide variety of dazzling colours never hurts either!
If you had to choose a favourite fall bloom, what would it be? Are you a mum maniac like myself or do you prefer something else? Would love to hear your thoughts! There are only a few more official weeks of fall left, so let’s relish every last opportunity to savour the season, shall we?

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB {words + photos})

Garden eye spy: Photography tip

Last week I gushed about the beauty and promise of morning light and apparently I can’t get enough of it! Here is another garden photo illuminated by a sunny glow and this week I’m going to share a photography tip so you too can capture a beautiful moment like this on camera!
The trick to achieving an image with a soft ethereal glow is to make sure that your light source (the sun, if you’re using natural night) is behind your photo subject. When shooting a flower in particular this ensures that the petals will be illuminated and retain their colour. If you photograph a flower with a strong light source hitting it from the front, the flower will become washed out or very high contrast which ruins the aesthetic of the image.

Once your light source is properly lined up, shoot ‘through’ the flower — not from above, not from below, but directly through it to capture the colours and glow at the same time. If need be use a camera hood or cup your hand above the camera lens to avoid any unwanted flares. Happy photographing!

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB {words + photos}  or via Twitter.)

Garden eye spy: Roses are red

What is it about roses that inspire adoration? For me I think it has something to do with my father’s prized English rose garden struggling to survive the harsh Canadian climate each year, thus making the triumphant fanfare of blossoms all the more impressive when they finally arrived. Or perhaps it is as simple as bold colour being captured within intricately grown petals. Whatever the reason, roses are my favourite floral subject to photograph.
This rose portrait was taken last weekend during a leisurely post-brunch stroll. I love the delicate folds, the soothing colour and the unexpected almost romantic pattern that lingers within this flower. Part of me is tempted to print this image to canvas and hang in my bedroom as a piece of artwork. Do you love roses as much as I do?

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB {words + photos}  or via Twitter.)

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