Gardening Blog

That post-show over-inspiration buzz

So the Calgary Horticultural Society Garden Show was, as expected, totally great. And I’m not just saying that because I was on stage.

Super fun once I got over the nerves. Lucky sneakers helped.

My biggest take away was from urban farmer Kevin Kossowan, who (among other things) grows veggies year round in Edmonton. Yes, Edmonton. My hometown, winter wonderland, outdone in nasty winter-ness only by the likes of Winnipeg.

Watch Kevin extend his super awesome cold frame

Kevin’s passion rekindled my commitment to all things edible. I learned how to tweak my cold frame design, and how to plant it better. I learned what a “shoulder season” is (the normally underused planting/harvest time in spring and fall). I find myself once again considering building a root cellar. I find myself itching to pull out the shovels as soon as I’m home. I find myself…

driving home in a snow storm.

And buried under it for the last three days.

I love Alberta.

Me at the Calgary Hort Show… when did I become an expert?

This weekend is the Calgary Horticultural Society’s Garden Show. It’s a fantastic show, with top-notch learning opportunities and inspiration. I’m super excited, as I was last year.

But this year I’m also really, really, nervous. Anxious, even.

Somehow or other, writing this blog for the last few years has given several people the notion that I know a fair bit about this gardening biz. Which, if I may toot my own horn, I do. But not much more than anyone else who’s been at it as long as I have, probably.

Tell that to the people who asked me to be a speaker at the show.

Tell that to the me of last January, who accepted the invitation.

My topic is, “How to start gardening in Calgary.” How’s that for wide open? All of the many places I could go with that have been playing out in my head, on paper, and in software for the last several weeks. I think I’ve got it honed down to a digestible size. And I’m going to have fun with it, I know I will.

But I’m still trying to figure out when I went from experimenter to expert.

If you’re coming to the show, I’m at the ‘How-to’ stage at 1:15 on Saturday. Come cheer me on… or heckle, as you see fit. And definitely come say hi.

 

Soil health: starting the season right

I love this quote from Beverley Nichols that showed up in an advice article in my CG email this week:

“Light in a garden is a quarter of the battle. Another quarter is the soil of the garden. A third quarter is the skill and care of the gardener. The fourth quarter is luck. Indeed, one might 
say that these were the four Ls of gardening, in the following order of importance: Loam, Light, Love and Luck.”
 

In fact, several of the bits of advice in the article mention the importance of healthy soil.

I consider myself a fairly well informed gardener. I’ve gleaned quite a bit of knowledge over the years about all kinds of topics, and lucky me, I have a pretty solid memory retention. But when it comes to soil health, I’ve pretty much spread on the compost and crossed my fingers. Last year, I started feeling that my soil was getting depleted. I can’t tell you exactly why, just a general sense that growth wasn’t as strong as it could be, drainage more sluggish than normal.

So when I learned a class was being put on by a neighbour, an expert in agricultural soil health, I immediately marked it on my calendar. The evening was really valuable, and I learned a whole lot, but it truly is one of those topics that start feeling bigger the more you learn.

Some of the fundamental things I seem to be doing right, but I’ve never been one to add commercial fertilizers, and I think my compost is simply missing some of the trace minerals that plants and soil need. Your average garden-center NPK (Nitrogen-Phosphorous-Potassium) products don’t have them either.

Here’s a few of the nutrients I learned about from my neighbour. A soil test is the best way to determine what you need, and a really good garden centre or agricultural consultant should be able to help you identify ways of adding them.

Nitrogen: encourages vegetative, or leafy, growth. If your pepper plants look gorgeous but aren’t flowering or setting fruit, they probably have (proportionally) too much nitrogen. Gasses off quickly, so must be topped up more frequently than other nutrients.

Phosphorous: encourages strong root growth and structure. Part of the problem with phosphorous is that it tends to bind with the soil, making not all of what’s in there available for plants to use. It’s needed early in the plant’s growth to do the most good.

Potassium: I always thought this was nutrient for flowering and fruiting, but the real benefit of this important nutrient is how it builds a plant’s aerial (above ground) structure: how strong the stems and leaves are, how well it can take up water, etc. Also fights high levels of magnesium.

Sulphur: competes with sodium. I need to keep the sulphur levels higher than my sodium levels and it will minimize the effects of an alkali (high sodium) soil–but that’s because I have a fairly alkaline (high pH) soil. If you have a more acidic soil, use calcium to balance out the sodium. (Are you confused yet?)

Calcium: among other things, contributes to the storability of the harvested fruit.

Boron: important in plant reproduction. When boron levels are low you end up with hollow potatoes and strawberries, or pea pods with only a few peas in them. But careful: high levels are toxic.

Then there’s magnesium and aluminum, which at high levels cause cracks on top of the soil and contribute to drainage problems. And selenium and zinc, which contribute to both human and plant immunity. But selenium is restricted in Canada as it’s categorized with–get this–arsenic.

Yikes. Apparently there’s a reason people go to universtiy to understand all the ins and outs of this science. I’m ready to throw up my hands and go back to my compost and crossed fingers.

But I did get a bag of fully balanced synthetic fertilizer, which I am spreading on this weekend–with the compost and the leaves.

 

Win tickets to Canada Blooms

I can’t believe Canada Blooms is only a week away. Where has the winter gone? I’m not lamenting that it’s almost over, that’s for sure, but it went by pretty quickly. I posted a wee preview this morning just to highlight a few of the gardens I’m looking forward to seeing.

This was one of my favourite gardens last year: "The Rebirth of Roncy" by Sara Jameson of Sweetpea's.

I have two pairs of tickets to give away. They get you into both Canada Blooms and the National Home Show, which are co-located at the Direct Energy Centre in Toronto from March 15 to March 24. To win, please leave a comment below telling me what you’re looking forward to seeing at Canada Blooms. Two responses will be selected at random Monday, March 11, 2013.

Contest closes March 11, 2013 at 12 p.m. EST. Open to all residents of Canada, except those in Quebec. Not open to any TC Media employees, their families, or any other persons with whom they reside. 

Good luck!

garden eye spy: spheres of daisies

I can’t wait to see delicate little blooms start to peek through the earth — can you? “Spring has sprung” is a wonderful saying and something that I am aching to experience again. Until then, these sweet little spheres will have to see us through the rest of the chilly snow! (Does anyone know what they are called by the way? I haven’t been able to find out!)

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB Creative  or via Twitter.)

A quick and easy bird-feeder post

When I was a kid, the bird feeder, seen from our large kitchen window provided endless entertainment. Chickadees, cardinals, blue jays, nuthatches, doves, juncoes and woodpeckers (to name a few) were all frequent visitors. A number of birdfeeders have come and gone over the years and all of them used to sit on a metal pole with the requisite squirrel guard that did absolutely nothing to deter the acrobatic squirrel population. I love this bird-feeder post (and its squirrel-proof feeder) that my father made last year. I thought I would share it to commemorate National Bird-Feeding Month, established by the National Bird-Feeding Society.

A closeup shot shows off the fancy bracket.

The instructions are quite simple. Add a post bracket to the bottom of an eight-foot-long 4×4 post (paint it first, if you wish) and pound it into the ground. My dad says you could also use sono tube and concrete post holes depending on how soft or firm your ground is. Screw on a bracket (from which you’ll hang your feeder), top with a fence post cap and voilà. An attractive bird-feeder stand.

garden eye spy: yellow nostalgia

As the days begin to get a little warmer once again I find myself craving more than ever bright, vibrant bursts of colour. So away to a florist’s I went this past weekend in search of cheerful, sunshine like blooms and this is what I found.
Just the sight of this pretty petaled poesy made me infinitely happier. Is there a particular colour that always stands out in the garden for you? I’d love to know!

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB Creative  or via Twitter.)

garden eye spy: winter berries

It is always a treat to stumble upon some bright colour in the garden, especially when trying to muddle through the overreaching presence of grey during the winter months.
These berries were a welcome surprise over the weekend while out for a meandering walk. The only downside, of course, is that they make me miss summer. What other lovely colours have you seen this winter?

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB Creative  or via Twitter.)

Garden eye spy: Nature’s patterns

We talk a lot about colour in this photo column, mostly because nature offers us an endless supply of hues to be enthralled by. However, another thrilling aspect of the natural world that should not be overlooked is pattern.
Take a moment and admire the textures and patterns present on the leaves of many common plants. They often look like a miniature seamstress has been hard at work, weaving together fine lines and beautiful colours. This leafy specimen reminded me of an intricate tapestry. What are some of your favourite colours and patterns to see in nature?

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB {words + photos}  or via Twitter.)

Garden eye spy: Raindrops

Winter is almost here, but before our little corner of the globe becomes blanketed with thick white snow I thought I would share one final fall photo. These beautiful little rain drops caught my eye while out on an afternoon fall stroll.
They reminded me of tiny glass pearls and the way they decorated the vibrant leafy presence of a humble flowering cabbage made me smile. Fall is always a comforting time of year, rain and all, because it makes me feel cozy. Do you enjoy rainy days? Will you miss rainy days or are you ready for full on snowfall?

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB {words + photos})

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