{ Posts Tagged ‘alberta’ }

Alberta flood aftermath

Enjoy your garden today, weeds and all: you’re not underwater.

Alberta is still reeling from the recent “unprecedented” flooding. (If I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard the word ‘unprecedented’ in the last week…) Much of High River is unlivable, Calgary’s C-Train rails are a mess, parts of Waterton Park are cut off because of washed out roads, and many other communities, including the Siksika Nation, have been ravaged.

As for us: we are damp but our sump pump has remained idle. However, I only have to go one or two degrees of separation (in several directions) to find someone airlifted out of their flooded yard, or unable to get to work, or dealing with a death, or facing a completely destroyed home. It will take years (up to ten, and a billion bucks, according to Alberta Premier Allison Redford) to “fully recover,” whatever that means.

Much is being done to help displaced people with food, shelter, hygiene, and even a little entertainment (yay, Nenshi!). I’m glad to say I have two cousins in government in the area who are spearheading relief efforts for the worst-hit communities.

Through all this, I have thought a couple of times about the unlucky gardeners wading through this mess.  It’s with a little guilt that I even mention it, because I don’t mean to minimize the bigger losses some have and will experience. Still, my heart goes out to those dealing with horticultural devastation too. A lot of passion and work can go into a garden, and it’s got to be hard to have that washed away. The Calgary Zoo, for instance, has a wonderful botanical garden and I’m curious and a little worried to see if it makes it through, not just the giraffes.

I went digging to see what might be done for the plant kingdom under these circumstances, and found this informative article for those ready to turn attention to their gardens.  Also, the Calgary Horticultural Society is planning to organize donations of time, tools, and plants to re-green flooded areas.

While not nearly as important as food, shelter, safety and power, I’m kind of glad this concern is being addressed. I don’t know about “fully recovering” from the emotional losses so many have suffered, but burdens can be eased in many ways, one of which is enjoying the beauty nature has to offer.

All in all, I’m proud of how Albertans are pulling together to get through this, and I’m thankful for all the support coming from near and far. I think we’ll be back to working, playing –and planting– before we know it.