{ Posts Tagged ‘flowers’ }

Flower Friday: #CGFlowerOfTheDay

If there’s one thing we love here at Canadian Gardening, it’s beautiful flowers. So, we ask our friends and followers on Instagram and Twitter to use the hashtag #CGFlowerOfTheDay to share pictures of the beautiful blooms growing in their gardens.

We’ve received everything from blooming roses and lilies to clematis and sunflowers. Since we love seeing all these wonderful flowers, we wanted to share some we’ve recently received through our @CDNGardening Twitter account.

cg-flower-of-the-day-sept

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Garden travel: Brussels’ famous flower carpet

Last summer, while traveling through Europe, I had the chance to visit the Grand Place in Brussels. It was by far one of my favourite places and now, a year later I can’t help but be a little jealous that I missed the over 750,000 colourful begonias that helped transform this historical city centre. Every two years in August, the Grand Place in Brussels is taken over by an enormous carpet of flowers. Started in 1971, by landscape architect E. Stautemans the tradition has continued due to its popularity and well, remarkable beauty.

flower-carpet-brussels-1

This year’s celebration marked the 50th anniversary of Turkish workers migrating to Belgium. Paying homage to Turkish culture, the carpet’s design depicted traditional patterns found in Turkish kilims.
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Move over ‘Annabelle’ and make way for your talented daughter

Three years ago, I found myself sitting beside Rob Naraj at an industry luncheon promoting new plant introductions. Rob and I were in the same year at U of Guelph, although he concentrated on the agricultural business program while I stuck more to ornamental horticulture. Rob is now the wholesale business manager at Sheridan Nurseries in Ontario, so he has a huge responsibility resting on his shoulders, and he does an A-1 job.

After lunch, Dr. Tim Woods (of Bloomerang lilac fame) from Spring Meadow Nursery in Michigan, took the microphone to introduce his phenomenal new smooth hydrangea cultivar (Hydrangea arborescens ‘Abetwo’, Zone 3), being marketed under the retail name “Incrediball.” Having spent more hours than I care to count propping up and staking the floppy, weak-stemmed H. a. ‘Annabelle’, I let slip a sotto voce groan. Rob immediately turned to me and said “No! You’ve gotta get some of these. Trust me!”

Incrediball as its flowers begin to open and expand in early summer

Incrediball as its flowers begin to open and expand in early summer

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DIY: House Plant Cupcakes

Talk about a succulent success!

When I came across these adorable house plant cupcakes by Alana Jones-Mann, I knew I had to share them. If you love miniature cacti and succulents, why not make an eye-catching edible version for your next get-together!

diy-houseplant-cupcakes-alana-jones-mann{Photo: alanajonesmann.com}

From desert to dessert, these cupcakes would be the perfect addition to a summer garden party or birthday celebration.

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6 weekend must-trys

Happy Friday! Not sure what’s on your agenda this weekend? No need to worry! From do-it-yourself projects to delicious summer recipes, here are 6 things worth adding to your weekend to-do list.

cg-blog-stone-planter{PHOTO: Joe Kim/TC Media}

1 Build a stone planter for succulents
Turn inexpensive stone slabs into a monolithic-style container for houseplants.

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Beautiful blooms at the Toronto Flower Market

The Toronto Flower Market returned to the city this past Saturday, May 10. From beautiful bouquets of locally grown tulips and potted campanulas to mini phalaenopsis and succulents, there was lots to see and buy! With so many beautiful blooms on display, I thought I would share a few of my favourites.

{Potted campanulas, Tony’s Floral Distribution}

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Follow Friday: Fashion Illustrator Grace Ciao

Like any other instagram-aholic, I love finding new and creative accounts to follow. So, when I came across a talented fashion illustrator and her unique use for beautiful blooms, I immediately hit “follow” (and you should, too!).

Toga Jumpsuit
{Image: Grace Ciao}

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The first perennials to flower in spring

It’s always a neck-and-neck contest to see whether it will be the small spring bulbs (snowdrops, snow crocuses and winter aconites) or hellebores (Helleborus spp. and cvs.) that win the race to produce the first flowers of the new gardening season once the witchhazels have finished.

In my garden, the snowdrops won the cup this year, but when the white stuff finally melted, it revealed hellebore blossoms that had already partially opened under a thin, insulating layer of snow.

We often get mail at this time of year asking whether gardeners should remove the leathery overwintering leaves of hellebores, or leave them in place to die down naturally (as with daffodils and tulips). The answer is that it’s really a matter of personal taste. Some gardeners feel that the old foliage offers protection against spring frosts, while others say that the previous season’s leaves detract from the plant’s overall appearance.

You be the judge, here’s the “before snipping” picture of two separate clumps:

And here’s the hellebore on the right, several days later:


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Sneak Preview: Gardiner in Bloom exhibition

Celebrate spring in the city with the Gardiner Museum‘s Spring Awakening: Gardiner in Bloom exhibition.

Featuring a collection of large-scale floral installations by six Toronto designers, the exhibit combines the beauty of spring blooms and the museum’s permanent collections. Yesterday, I was lucky enough to be invited for a behind-the-scenes look at the exhibit. While designers hung branches, positioned flowers and placed moss I managed to snap a few pictures of these one-of-a-kind creations.

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Valentine’s Day gift idea: Garden-in-a-Bag

This charming Garden-in-a-Bag is the most clever way to give flowers this Valentine’s Day (and the blooms will last much longer than ones from the florist). Read the rest of this entry »

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