{ Posts Tagged ‘garden photos’ }

Welcome, winter

The bulbs are in the ground, the hoses are put away, the cold frame is tucked in with leaves.

See you next year!

View out our front window.

Laurel leaf willows in the morning sun.

Mountain ash ready for a snooze.

Who's been visiting the bird house?

Asparagus fronds are gorgeous in the frost.

Garden eye spy: Photography tip

Last week I gushed about the beauty and promise of morning light and apparently I can’t get enough of it! Here is another garden photo illuminated by a sunny glow and this week I’m going to share a photography tip so you too can capture a beautiful moment like this on camera!
The trick to achieving an image with a soft ethereal glow is to make sure that your light source (the sun, if you’re using natural night) is behind your photo subject. When shooting a flower in particular this ensures that the petals will be illuminated and retain their colour. If you photograph a flower with a strong light source hitting it from the front, the flower will become washed out or very high contrast which ruins the aesthetic of the image.

Once your light source is properly lined up, shoot ‘through’ the flower — not from above, not from below, but directly through it to capture the colours and glow at the same time. If need be use a camera hood or cup your hand above the camera lens to avoid any unwanted flares. Happy photographing!

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB {words + photos}  or via Twitter.)

Garden eye spy: Morning light

When is your favourite time to be in a garden? The sun-kissed afternoon? The late serene evening? I personally love the very early morning for one special reason; soft light. Everything looks more magical in those few precious hours before the world fully wakes and gives way to its inevitable hustle and bustle. A romantic quality lingers wherever the light touches.
Take this pretty blossom for example. Standing on its own off to the side of a garden path, it is probably overlooked most of the time. But in the gentle glow of morning it becomes illuminated, the centre of attention, the star of the walkway.

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB {words + photos}  or via Twitter.)

Garden eye spy: Magical magenta

The composition of a flower is almost magical, but even more impressive is its vibrant colour. Take this beautiful blossom for example. It is completely and utterly natural. There is no dye involved in its beauty, no fabric interfering with its dressage. It just is.
Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could all follow nature’s example a little more regularly in our own lives? Rather than be distracted by labels and fancy packaging, we should slow down and observe our own individual beauty for what it is — ours. What is your favourite colour in nature? I am definitely partial to this magenta tone!

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media.  Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her blog, LLB {words + photos} or via Twitter.)

Plants with curls

Now that my garden is fast asleep, I fulfill my gardening urges by sorting through my garden photos. We all admire plants for their colourful blooms and interesting foliage, but what about their other unique attributes.

Take curls for example. I found these two examples of plants with curls in my garden photos, but I know there are many other plants that showcase these curly tendrils. Of course I admire the plant’s ”whole package’, but sometimes it’s fun to focus on one interesting aspect. So today, it’s all about curls!

Yucca tendrils

Yucca tendrils

Pumpkin tendrils

Pumpkin tendrils