{ Posts Tagged ‘garden tour’ }

Garden Walk Buffalo impresses

I was fortunate enough to visit Garden Walk Buffalo last weekend. With more than 350 private gardens on show, the tour is the largest in the U.S. Over two days on the last weekend in July, enthusiastic gardeners open their yards to about 50,000 walkers.

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A garden tour of The Beach

I've seen half numbers in addresses before–usually on a house subdivided into apartments. But as I approach 44 ½ Victoria Park, I'm greeted by a gate of sorts framing a path, right between two homes. The path takes me past both houses and their backyards, and leads me to this amazing, magical lot, perched on a ravine. I want to move there. This house is the first on a preview of Toronto Botanical Garden`s annual Through the Garden Gate garden tour. This year, for the first time, the tour takes place in the Beach neighbourhood of Toronto. June 19 and 20, visitors will be allowed to take in 26 private gardens like this one, which you would never know even existed. Apparently it used to be a cottage with its own little road that was eliminated over time–hence the half-numbered address. The other homes we preview each boast their own unique attributes, including a couple with spectacular lakefront views, one with over 50 Japanese maples, and another with a contemporary water feature in a cosy backyard. I will definitely be going back next weekend to take in the other 21 homes on the tour–or at least most of them!

Scroll below the event details for a few preview pics!

Here are the details:
When: The tour takes place Saturday June 19 and Sunday June 20 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tour headquarters: Neil McNeil High School at 127 Victoria Park Ave.
Ticket includes: Comprehensive Garden Guide, access to the 26 gardens with experts in each garden and complimentary shuttle service.

Tickets can be purchased online at the Toronto Botanical Garden website (prices are listed there, as well) and at the following outlets:

  • Shop TBG, 777 Lawrence Ave. E
  • Blossoms Rosedal, 1 Rowanwood Ave.
  • Bill's Garden Centre, 903 Pape Ave.
  • Plant World, 4,000 Eglinton Ave. W
  • Sheridan Nurseries, 2827 Yonge St.
  • Sheridan Nurseries, 784 Sheppard Ave. E
Enter this gate at 44 1/2 Victoria Park and you'll never want to leave!

Enter this gate at 44 1/2 Victoria Park and you'll never want to leave!

This is my favourite garden, so I'm showing another photo. By the way there are two other ponds as well as a swimming pool. This lot is an anomaly in the city. What I love about it is the owner and her family all contributed.

This is my favourite garden, so I'm showing another photo. This is the one with over 50 Japanese maples. The lot is over an acre, an anomaly in the city. What I love about the gardens is the fact that the whole family has contributed. And the owner has such an eye for flow and colour and texture.

This water feature at 51 Northern Dancer Blvd. (and the garden) were designed by Kim Price Landscape. It cleverly hides the garage that is mere steps from the back door of the house.

This water feature at 51 Northern Dancer Blvd. (and the garden) were designed by Kim Price Landscape. It cleverly hides the garage that is mere steps from the back door of the house.

Riding the rails

Some people imagine the Prairies to be flat and uninteresting. More fools them. There's a subtle beauty and a luminous colour to the fields and sky, and a wide horizon. In many places, the land undulates, catching patterns of light and shade, a bit like the sea.

The train chugged along toward Edmonton while I sat in the panorama car and drank in my fill of the view, and then went downstairs to meet Carol and have a drink of another kind. There we struck up a lively conversation with Dave, a good-looking, friendly Brit on the first leg of his round-the-world journey, which he reckons will take about a year (he'd hopped on the train in Halifax and was going to Vancouver en route to points south). We spent the evening swapping yarns and having a really good laugh. Cheers!

That's the thing about train travel–you have the time to get to know all sorts of people if you're so inclined. On this leg, there was also Amy from southern Ontario, a youngish married woman travelling to Vancouver with her spry old granny–both of them heading west for the first time. We heard all about it at dinner (I had butternut squash soup, salad, wild Pacific salmon with a melon salsa, baby carrots and garlic chive mashed potatoes and chocolate truffle cake). And the happy couple from Prince George, who were celebrating their anniversary and had booked the Romance by Rail package to Halifax. This meant two compartments were combined into a single luxurious one, with queen-sized bed, fresh flowers, sparkling wine–the works. Come to think of it, we didn't see too much of them…

While there are many lovely things to recommend traveling by train, there is a caveat: it's vital to leave the rat-race mentality behind. I was told that VIA runs on CN tracks where freight is king, so passenger trains have to give way and delays are common. “Schedules are subject to change,” means just that, especially if, like us, you're planning to hop off and spend a few days at various destinations. My best advice is to get into a slower, gentler rhythm and let your holiday start when you climb aboard. Then, to keep your blissfully zen-like mood, do not under any circumstances schedule any connections you need to make even remotely close to your E.T.A.–in fact, schedule them for the next day if possible so you can truly rest easy.