{ Posts Tagged ‘gardening tips’ }

Four more early summer bridging plants

I’ve been looking back at some of the garden pictures I’ve taken over the past month or so, and in particular at the plants and shrubs that bloom after the spring glut, but before main season summer-flowering species take over during the hottest part of the year. These are useful “bridging plants” that prevent flower beds from looking empty as one season gives way to another.

In fact, they’re so useful for maintaining a steady stream of flowers that I intend to bulk up my stocks for next year, beginning with Mayapples:

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Taking over nicely from springtime hepaticas, trilliums and Jack-in-the-pulpits are our native Mayapples (Podophyllum peltatum, Zone 4) which produce fragrant white blooms underneath their leafy green “umbrellas.” I grow them in full shade in moist, humus-rich soil where they spend the summer with various ferns and monkshoods; dryer soils will result in plants going dormant in midsummer. Spreading slowly via underground rhizomes (or stems), any unwanted plants are easy to pull out.

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Happy National Gardening Exercise Day!

Did you know that June 6 is National Gardening Exercise Day (NGED). Not only is gardening a great way to relax and unwind, it also builds muscle and burns calories!


You might not realize the amount of good exercise you can get while working outside in your garden; container gardening, weeding, lawn care, pruning and preparing planting beds are just some of the many ways you’re staying healthy and active while outside.

In celebration of NGED, here are some great tips for staying healthy while in the garden.

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Spring fling

Spring is bustin’ out all over” …to mangle the Rodgers and Hammerstein song title ever so slightly. And after about a week of “normal” temperatures, everything seems to be popping out of the ground at the same time.

As if to prove it, a clump of our gorgeous native pasque flower (Pulsatilla patens, Zone 3)—native from Ontario to Yukon—is blooming at the same time as some neighbouring (squirrel-planted) broad-leaved grape hyacinths (Muscari latifolium, Zone 4) which are usually busy producing seed by the time the pasque flowers bloom.


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Garden eye spy: Nature’s patterns

We talk a lot about colour in this photo column, mostly because nature offers us an endless supply of hues to be enthralled by. However, another thrilling aspect of the natural world that should not be overlooked is pattern.
Take a moment and admire the textures and patterns present on the leaves of many common plants. They often look like a miniature seamstress has been hard at work, weaving together fine lines and beautiful colours. This leafy specimen reminded me of an intricate tapestry. What are some of your favourite colours and patterns to see in nature?

(Laura L. Benn is the Multi-brand Web Content Editor at TC Media. Follow her writing, photography and other creative ventures on her popular blog LLB {words + photos}  or via Twitter.)

Happy holidays fellow budding gardeners!

Well, my work week is just about done, which means I’ll be taking an indulgence-filled break from being a budding gardener. I just wanted to wish everyone a safe and happy holiday season. We have lots of great gardening tips and ideas planned for 2010. And, as always, welcome your feedback about what you want to see on the site (please leave your comments below).

See you next year!