{ Posts Tagged ‘Gardening’ }

Flower Friday: #CGFlowerOfTheDay

If there’s one thing we love here at Canadian Gardening, it’s beautiful flowers. So, we ask our friends and followers on Instagram and Twitter to use the hashtag #CGFlowerOfTheDay to share pictures of the beautiful blooms growing in their gardens.

We’ve received everything from blooming roses and lilies to clematis and sunflowers. Since we love seeing all these wonderful flowers, we wanted to share some we’ve recently received through our @CDNGardening Twitter account.

cg-flower-of-the-day-sept

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Growing trend: Fruit and vegetable moulds

Anyone with a fruit or vegetable garden is probably well aware that sometimes during the growing period crops can take on a mind of their own. 3-in-1 strawberries, funny looking carrots or misshaped zucchini are all normal occurrences. These shapes can happen unintentionally, but what if you had the ability to grow your best bounty in fun and interesting shapes on purpose.

Developed in China, specially designed plastic moulds are used to transform fruits and vegetables into a variety of shapes. From heart-shaped watermelons and star-shaped English cucumbers to even these Buddha-shaped pears.

cg-blog-fruit-mould-pear-2

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Move over ‘Annabelle’ and make way for your talented daughter

Three years ago, I found myself sitting beside Rob Naraj at an industry luncheon promoting new plant introductions. Rob and I were in the same year at U of Guelph, although he concentrated on the agricultural business program while I stuck more to ornamental horticulture. Rob is now the wholesale business manager at Sheridan Nurseries in Ontario, so he has a huge responsibility resting on his shoulders, and he does an A-1 job.

After lunch, Dr. Tim Woods (of Bloomerang lilac fame) from Spring Meadow Nursery in Michigan, took the microphone to introduce his phenomenal new smooth hydrangea cultivar (Hydrangea arborescens ‘Abetwo’, Zone 3), being marketed under the retail name “Incrediball.” Having spent more hours than I care to count propping up and staking the floppy, weak-stemmed H. a. ‘Annabelle’, I let slip a sotto voce groan. Rob immediately turned to me and said “No! You’ve gotta get some of these. Trust me!”

Incrediball as its flowers begin to open and expand in early summer

Incrediball as its flowers begin to open and expand in early summer

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6 weekend must-trys

Happy Friday! Not sure what’s on your agenda this weekend? No need to worry! From do-it-yourself projects to delicious summer recipes, here are 6 things worth adding to your weekend to-do list.

cg-blog-stone-planter{PHOTO: Joe Kim/TC Media}

1 Build a stone planter for succulents
Turn inexpensive stone slabs into a monolithic-style container for houseplants.

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Transitioning from late spring to early summer

It’s with a certain sadness that I bid adieu to the last daffodils to bloom in my garden. Known botanically as Narcissus poeticus var. recurvus (Zone 4), they bear flowers with small, red-rimmed golden cups (or coronas) that are surrounded by pure white recurved petals (known as perianth segments). Native to Switzerland and commonly called “old pheasant’s eye”, their blossoms are deliciously fragrant, and a perfect example of a genus going out with a bang rather than a whimper.

Apart from Switzerland, one of the best places to see old pheasant’s eye growing wild is in northern England, up to the Scottish Borders where—in a climate not unlike that of their homeland—they have naturalised over hundreds of years, and now cover entire hillsides. All you have to do is follow your nose, as you’re likely to smell their sweet scent before actually clapping eyes on their breathtaking flowers en masse. They’ll naturalise in Canada too (albeit more slowly), providing you let them set seed and allow their leaves to mature.

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Celebrate Garden Days

Looking for something fun to do with the gardening enthusiast in your life? How about celebrating Garden Days!

Organized by the Canadian Garden Council, Garden Days is a three-day event in celebration of National Garden Day. From June 13 to 15, green-thumbs of all ages can enjoy a variety of activities hosted by local gardens, garden centres, horticultural organizations and garden-related businesses in their city.
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Happy National Gardening Exercise Day!

Did you know that June 6 is National Gardening Exercise Day (NGED). Not only is gardening a great way to relax and unwind, it also builds muscle and burns calories!


You might not realize the amount of good exercise you can get while working outside in your garden; container gardening, weeding, lawn care, pruning and preparing planting beds are just some of the many ways you’re staying healthy and active while outside.

In celebration of NGED, here are some great tips for staying healthy while in the garden.

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National Sun Awareness Week

After what felt like an eternity of cold winter weather, the flowers are blooming, the sun is shining and we can all get back out into the garden.

Whether you’re building raised flowerbeds, mowing the lawn or simply enjoying afternoons on the patio, we can’t forget the importance of summer suncare – and what better way to remind us than the Canadian Dermatology Association’s annual, nationwide Sun Awareness Week.

Before heading outside to enjoy the warm weather, here are a few helpful tips you should remember.
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Spring fling

Spring is bustin’ out all over” …to mangle the Rodgers and Hammerstein song title ever so slightly. And after about a week of “normal” temperatures, everything seems to be popping out of the ground at the same time.

As if to prove it, a clump of our gorgeous native pasque flower (Pulsatilla patens, Zone 3)—native from Ontario to Yukon—is blooming at the same time as some neighbouring (squirrel-planted) broad-leaved grape hyacinths (Muscari latifolium, Zone 4) which are usually busy producing seed by the time the pasque flowers bloom.


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Beautiful blooms at the Toronto Flower Market

The Toronto Flower Market returned to the city this past Saturday, May 10. From beautiful bouquets of locally grown tulips and potted campanulas to mini phalaenopsis and succulents, there was lots to see and buy! With so many beautiful blooms on display, I thought I would share a few of my favourites.

{Potted campanulas, Tony’s Floral Distribution}

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