{ Posts Tagged ‘marjorie harris’ }

Celebrating 175 years!

Last night The Horticultural Societies of Parkdale and Toronto held a gala reception to celebrate their 175th anniversary. Speakers included Mayor David Miller; The Honourable David C. Onley, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario; Paul Zammit from the Toronto Botanical Garden and Marjorie Harris, author of my fave gardening book this season, Ecological Gardening.

The event was held at Allan Gardens, this gem in the middle of the city that I didn't know existed! I had to Google-map it before I left. The reception began in the Palm House, (a structure built in 1910 that was modeled after similar buildings from that era in the United States and England). Afterwards, you could stroll through the six greenhouses that play host to different themes and plant life. Right now there are displays of colourful mums for their Chrysanthemum Festival and I was told there are some beautiful holiday blooms around Christmastime.

You can get to the entrance from the south side of Carlton Street between Jarvis and Sherbourne. According to the website, Allan Gardens is open from 10 to 5. If you live in Toronto, I encourage you to check it out! I've heard that it's really neat to go in the dead of winter when you're longing for signs of life and greenery.

Here are some photos I took of the event.

Me and The Honourable David C. Onley, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. I used to be a guest from time to time on his show, Homepage, when he was still at CityTV and CP24.

Me and The Honourable David C. Onley, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. I used to be a guest from time to time on his show, Homepage, when he was still at CityTV and CP24.

Walking into the Chrysanthemum Festival greenhouse.

Walking into the Chrysanthemum Festival greenhouse.

100 oil lamps were positioned throughout all the gardens creating a warm ambience.

100 oil lamps were positioned throughout all the gardens creating a warm ambience.

I'm clearly not a botanical photographer, but I loved the rich, buttery yellow of this flower and the curly petals.

I'm clearly not a botanical photographer, but I loved the rich, buttery yellow of this flower and its curly petals.

Eco-gardening lessons I’ve learned this week

ecologicalgardeningcoverI’ve been reading Ecological Gardening by Marjorie Harris on the subway. I love it because it’s trade paperback-sized–perfect for my purse–and it’s so conversational, you don’t even realize you’re reading non-fiction sometimes. The Globe and Mail wrote that “the facts come across as if from a helpful conversation with a good friend.” I need to remember to keep a pad of sticky notes in my purse to mark all the pages I want to come back to. I really want to strive to make my garden as healthy as possible and I’m so excited about what I’ve been learning.

Here are some of the facts I have learned from my new friend Marjorie:

  • Dandelions only grow in fertile, balanced soil. Their crazy long roots can actually bring nutrients from deep in the soil up to the surface. This is good news because I have a ton in my backyard and now I don’t feel so bad. They can also apparently help the growth of other flowers.
  • Watering thoroughly once a week is better for the plants than shallowly watering each day–except for containers which sometimes need to be watered twice a day.
  • Not all ants are bad. The other day some of the buds on one of my flowering perennials (I’m not sure what it is, but it has electric-blue frilly petals) had these little ants on them. I was a little alarmed at first, but according to Marjorie, they were sipping the sap from the buds, which isn’t harmful. Also, some of the other ugly beasties I’ve seen in my garden aren’t at all bad, so I need to make friends with them, too.
  • I think one of the best pieces of advice I have taken away this week from the book is to feed the soil, not the plant. If a plant is suffering and you’ve done all the things you’re supposed to–watering, given it adequate light, etc.–your problem likely lies in the soil and what it might be lacking. Marjorie provides lots of easy troubleshooting tips for amending your soil.

This weekend I hope to tackle my monster rose bush with the brand new rose gloves I got from my sister for my birthday.

Here are a couple of excerpts from Marjorie’s book on CanadianGardening.com:

The first snowfall

The first snowfall caught some Torontonians by surprise. The garden next door is still littered with colourful plastic toys, now dusted with snow, while a forlorn-looking garden umbrella sits at half-mast in its holder.

“Geez, I didn’t think it would snow so soon,” my neighbour ruefully admitted, as the two of us shovelled our respective walks this morning. The weather is supposed to be warming up next week, so likely she’ll still have time to gather up everything before serious winter bites.

I took this photograph from my back deck, which gives you some idea of what I look at from my breakfast room. Not bad, eh? When I was a young gardener, I grew loads of flowers and little else. As a consequence, in winter my backyard looked flat, bald and blah. A depressing sight for a housebound young mother with two babies, which I was back then.

But the longer you garden, the more you learn.

Now, there’s plenty to gaze at year-round. There are loads of shrubs and small trees for visiting birds to perch on, and quite a few evergreens of various kinds, which tend to take a back seat in summer but come to the fore when the snow flies.

I really like broadleafed evergreens, too, and in this climate (Zone 6) they look good throughout winter. Sarcoxie euonymus (the plain green kind–my favourite) cloaks my fences. This plant takes a while to get established, but once it starts climbing it’s great. (In summer, vines such as clematis clamber through it.) And the neighbour whose house is joined to mine has a massive Oregon grape (Mahonia spp.) that sits on our property line and lends its imposing leafy presence all year.

Some of my deciduous plants keep their foliage for a long time, too, such as the columnar beech halfway down the garden and my bayberry (Myrica pensylvanica), which has taken on an impressive size.

There’s lots to love about the winter landscape.

The white stuff aside (the first snowfall of winter is always a joy), it’s been a rather unsettling week. Last Friday, I found out our major competitor, Gardening Life, is folding. Contrary to what you might think, I am saddened by this, and especially for Marjorie Harris, whose baby the magazine has been since Day One. Ironically, Marjorie and Liz Primeau, our magazine’s founding editor, are coming to my house for lunch on Monday. We try to do this once a year, and the date was decided long before this bad news broke. This time, there’ll be champagne for sure. I think we’ll drink to resilience.

Incidentally, Liz has just written her memoir. It’s called My Natural History: The Evolution of a Gardener and is published by Greystone Books. I’ve reviewed it in our winter issue, and it’s a cracking good read. And some of you may not know that as well as being a journalist and author, Marjorie is also a garden consultant. I reckon she’d be a fun person to have advise you on your patch. If you’d like to know more about the services she offers, you can check out www.marjorieharris.com/Flyer/index.php.