{ Posts Tagged ‘sustainable horticulture’ }

Rethinking how we do food

Here’s a news article that caught my attention this weekend: a Dutch architectural firm has plans to construct a supermarket in Rotterdam where everything is grown on site, from avocados to fish. An interesting take on the concept of urban farming, it’s intended to be totally sustainable, and save all kinds of resources (including money) because of the virtual elimination of packaging and transport, as well as providing public green space.

Ambitious? Oh yeah. Will it actually happen? We’ll see.

But beyond the possibility and plausibility, what I love about the idea (and I don’t love everything) is that it’s another attempt to think outside the box and recreate our food system. We’ve hit 7 billion humans on the planet now, and it’s going to take some creativity to feed them all. Big scale projects like the Rotterdam supermarket, high-rise greenhouses in our downtowns, and stashing heirloom seeds in Scandinavian caves are likely going to be key to making a real difference, but it gets me thinking about all the things each of us can do to make our personal load on the system as light as possible.

People do try to grow everything we are accustomed to eating on their own land, though few of us have the space, time, resources, or motivation to pull it off. Nor is it always terribly efficient. But, in your own yard, is there a vegetable or two you love that could cozy up with your prize perennials? Do you really need all that lawn? Or even like taking care of it? Why are our public parks full of ornamental trees and annual flowers? Why aren’t there apple trees and annual vegetables in the mix? Would it be more maintenance? Could the food be harvested by food banks and soup kitchens?

Okay, I know, I’m a new-age hippie who wants to save the world. Maybe I’m crazy. But how about just letting some of these ideas settle in the back of your brain for the winter? Think about it as you daydream about planting for next year. Keep it in mind when your community is looking for projects. Maybe you’ve got a little save-the-world streak too.

Sustainable horticulture

In today’s fast paced society, do we ever stop to smell the roses anymore? We’re so busy working, shopping, driving – most of us have very muddy carbon footprints. Sustainable living is a phrase that’s been used a lot lately. Basically, it refers to a lifestyle choice that encourages people to live in harmony with nature.

A new initiative to promote sustainable living at the Royal Botanical Gardens (RBG) in Burlington, Ontario is the Canadian Institute for Sustainable Biodiversity (CISB).

The RBG recently announced a multidisciplinary symposium scheduled for February 2010 on sustainability and horticulture, entitled ‘Living Plants, Liveable Communities: Exploring Sustainable Horticulture for the 21st Century.’ This symposium is being designed to teach Canadians how to live with the environment in a sustainable way.

Here are a sustainable living tips that you can use at home in your garden:

  • check your outdoor taps for leaks
  • recycle your garden pots
  • mulch your garden beds to help reduce the amount you need to water
  • if you have to water your lawn, give it a deep soak to allow the roots to absorb the water
  • grow a veggie garden and enjoy home grown produce
  • compost all your organic kitchen waste
  • try xeriscaping in your garden with drought-tolerant plants