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Fruit trees

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Re: Fruit trees

Postby Mostly Weeds » Apr 30, 2012 10:42 am

What are folk's thoughts on these 5-in-1 variety fruit trees that seem to be so popular at all of my local garden centres? Are they self-pollinating in that they have all those different grafts sharing a trunk? I almost pulled the trigger a couple times in the fall on some 5-in-1 peach and apple trees when they were down to as low as $35 or so. They're all usually 6' specimens. I'm worried about shading out the rest of my veggie gardens and I can't really think of a good spot to put a few fruit trees even though I would LOVE to add them to my little homesteading setup. My wife would probably baulk at the idea of an orchard on the front lawn, especially after I stripped, reseeded and installed a sprinkler system last year haha.
“The average person is still under the aberrant delusion that food should be somebody else's responsibility until I'm ready to eat it.” - Joel Salatin

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Re: Fruit trees

Postby orchidguy » Apr 30, 2012 11:55 am

Grenville is usually used as a pollinator for the Pembina Plum.
The Mount Royal is a self-pollinator
Brookgold uses Nanking cherry or other late blooming japanese plums as it's pollinator, and Brookred is used as a pollinizer for Pembina
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Re: Fruit trees

Postby DonnaZn2SK » Apr 30, 2012 12:54 pm

orchidguy wrote:Grenville is usually used as a pollinator for the Pembina Plum.
The Mount Royal is a self-pollinator
Brookgold uses Nanking cherry or other late blooming japanese plums as it's pollinator, and Brookred is used as a pollinizer for Pembina

That's right, Dan, I remember Brookred was recommended as a pollinator. Do you know what Grenville is like? I've never seen it around here.

I like the taste of Pembina but the skins are too tough to eat and the flesh is too mushy and juicy to make into anything. I don't have much room for a tree that just "takes up space", ideally, the other plum tree should produce plums that are good tasting and perhaps something I can use for canning or jams. What do you think?
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Re: Fruit trees

Postby orchidguy » Apr 30, 2012 1:44 pm

Donna,
I only use the Pembina for canning,as long as they are not overripe. As you have said, the skins are just too tough for eating out of hand.

The Grenville is exactly opposite. They are excellent eaten fresh, but don't have the meatiest texture which is needed for canning (jarring) Although I did make a plum jelly out of them that is used to glaze some meats, especially when combined with a hot red pepper jelly. They are very sweet, and the fruit looks great (kind of a reddish orange colour) They have not got overly big here, and have always been a well behaved tree. When first purchased, they were touted as growing about 20' high and 20' spread, but in over a decade, it has never reached the 15' mark. It is an extremely pretty tree, and when in bloom, I cannot even see the branches
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