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Brussel Sprouts

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Re: Brussel Sprouts

Postby Dumbo » May 27, 2012 11:58 pm

Found a bit more. It said brussel sprouts are one of the most susceptible plants to this disease.

It said it can be carried over by seed but occurrence is not as common as being carried over via contaminated soil (ie store bought plant).

Well that settles this one I guess.

This is the type of thing you plant in a pot for safety and not in your garden. Live and learn. Just hope I don't end up with this thing. Will know in fall when I pull the plant up!

If there is a next time, it will only go in a pot. At the end of the season the earth dumped into the garbage.

Wonder if I should pull this thing up now and just chuck it? Is it worth it? What would you guys/woman do? What are the odds?
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Re: Brussel Sprouts

Postby davefrombc » May 28, 2012 1:32 am

I wouldn't be quite so paranoid over something I read.. Yes , club root can affect brassicas; but it isn't really that common. I have seen commercial farmers grow Sprouts 2 and 3 years in a row in the same field. No sense pulling up your plants . if the club root was present , it would already be in your soil. You won't have t o wait for fall to know if a plant is infected .. It would not grow properly and the damage would be evident fairly early . I have never known anyone who had to grow their Brussels Sprouts in pots because of club root problems here. Maybe it's different in your area, but my guess is it really isn't a major worry.
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Re: Brussel Sprouts

Postby OGrubber » May 28, 2012 9:37 am

Well, if you're banning b.sprouts, then you might as well ban broccoli and cabbage, or any other brassica for that matter. Club root isn't that common - at least, I've never seen it. Also, my understanding is that the fungal disease "clubroot" prefers acidic soils, so, another reason to maintain a neutral ph in the veg gardens.

If you bought seedlings from a nursery, it [they] would have been grown in a sterile soil-less mix so doubtful that you would be introducing the disease via that route. I'm guessing, plants that have club-root wouldn't have the strength to make it to their second year [pretty sure all brassicas are biennials] in order to produce seed, so I would say, you can discount the introduction of the disease from seed.

4 year thing; It's the recommended rotation for all crop "families", in and out of a particular area. Because all crop families feed on different levels at different rates and have their own particular "pest" and "disease" issues, the rotation is meant to prevent the build-up of those particular pests and diseases, as well as utilizing different nutrients from different levels of the soil, which in turn balances out your necessary inputs.....
edit;
after having said "pretty sure all brassicas are biennials", I thought of a host of brassicas that if they aren't in fact annuals, can be tricked into acting like annuals.
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Re: Brussel Sprouts

Postby Eeyore » May 28, 2012 10:37 am

There was an outbreak of clubroot in Alberta a few years ago affecting Canola. In that case I would think it must have come from infected seed. I'm not sure what was done about it or if those farmers are growing something else right now.
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Re: Brussel Sprouts

Postby Dumbo » May 28, 2012 10:59 am

Yeah I'm really not sure what to make of it.

I started everything from seed so even if this thing was kicking around, the odds should be good.

Like I said, I really don't know why I have only seen this warning only on brussels. I never heard of any of this till I started looking into the warnings and asking myself, why am I only seeing this on brussels and not anything else?

OGrubber wrote:Well, if you're banning b.sprouts, then you might as well ban broccoli and cabbage

Ooooh the kids would love you if I showed them this quote. haha ;) That quote has the power to start a kid revolution at the dinner table.

After reading the warning, then about this disease, I discovered the "half life" of the disease is 3.6 years [ie. Half-life = The time required for half of this pathogen to die out if you don't plant anything of the brussel family]. Thus... you get 4 years (ie the warnings I saw). And the odd thing is, it's the same time frame as the rotation thing you and Dave mention.

Maybe this is a common rule of thumb in agriculture, and a common half-life for many pathogens and that's is why rotation is 4 years like you and Dave stated. Or specific for this pathogen which is coincidence? I really don't know. I know nothing about this type of thing and only have bits and pieces from a dozen websites that may not be true and accurate at all .

I won't pull them out. But I'll remember to check out the roots in the fall since it sparked my curiosity. Seems to me it's roundish nodules to look for.

Yeah in Alberta is seems hundreds of farms have been devastated with this.
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Re: Brussel Sprouts

Postby OGrubber » May 28, 2012 11:04 am

That's interesting Lyn.
In that instance, if it was introduced, it could easily have been by seed. The thing about a lot of soil born diseases though, is that they "lie in wait" for the right conditions...
How devastating for all those farmers.
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Re: Brussel Sprouts

Postby OGrubber » May 28, 2012 11:08 am

You will probably know before fall if you have clubfoot. By all accounts the plants will be wilty and show very poor growth.
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Re: Brussel Sprouts

Postby Dumbo » May 28, 2012 11:10 am

In the case of Alberta, I was reading it has a lot to do with contaminated machinery and tools. That is why is spread so rapidly.
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Re: Brussel Sprouts

Postby davefrombc » May 28, 2012 12:03 pm

If the root is infected Marc, it won't be just little nodules, the root will be a very knobby deformed thing.. Lots of plants form nodules on their roots. Clover and the legume family ( peas, beans & kin) produce them ..They are filled with nitrogen fixing bacteria which help increase the fertility of soils they are grown in .
A quick Google search will bring up a wealth of pix of club root infected plants
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Re: Brussel Sprouts

Postby Dumbo » May 28, 2012 12:45 pm

Yeah I did see that. Seems there are varying degrees of this infection/pathogen.

What the roots look like on a fist outbreak, and after a year or so as this pathogen builds up in the soil. The huge club like root is the full out pathogen build-up, as far as I can tell.

I no longer recall but it was either an American EDU site, Agriculture Canada, or the UK Royal Society that showed pictures of roots as it builds up in the soil.
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