Garden Projects and Ideas - Gardening Forums

Utilizing Downspout Rain Water

Need advice about building a raised garden bed, double-digging or installing an irrigation system? This is the place to find the help you need!

Postby LeeInEdmonton » Jun 13, 2008 6:56 pm

Very good Durgan;

We presently do not have a rain barrel set-up, but when we did we used two barrels side by side. Myrt reserved one barrel when it was full & metered in her soluable fertilizer for her flowers leaving the other barrel untreated. When her treated barrel was empty, she would switch & treat the other barrel when it was full. I keep getting a hard time about no handy set-up at present. Oh welllll.

Lee
User avatar
LeeInEdmonton
 
Posts: 1015
Joined: Nov 15, 2006 7:41 pm

Postby Durgan » Jun 13, 2008 7:50 pm

Hey people! The system is simple utilizing local supplies. It only takes a few hours of work. It sure beats an open contaimer under a eves trough down spout.

Step one. Figure out your feed system one day and buy the downspout connectors as required. This can be simple particularly if you buy a pair of the "crimping" pliers utilized for eves trough work. These are usually in the Industrial section. Home Depot was out of them so I had to do some butcher work joining some pieces. Above all make it sure you can change back for the freezing Winter conditions easily. I now prefer a direct connection, since there is no leakage, as opposed to the one system I posted, which has been deleted.

Decide where the barrel overflow is going to land, because there will always be overflow depending upon the amount of rainfall. I found a simple plastic screw type to hose connector for the large bung hole in Home Depot, and a plastic hose can be put on this opening to direct the overflow, if necessary.

The feed hole in the barrel can be cut easily with a single blade hacksaw and a drill bit to start the hole.

The support cable loops can be made using bolt clamps instead of crimping to save the price of the large crimping tool.

The strong fence post can be easily driven into the ground with almost any hammer. I have a post driver, but have used a heavy hammer.

And remember the system is basically sealed. No screens are necessary to eliminate bugs. The bung hole is only open during rainstorms, and to let air into the (second) barrel when withdrawing water. The first barrel has enough air due to the feed hole.

The taps are a standard 3/4 NPT boiler drain valve, availabe for about $7.00 in any decent hardware store.

Get to it! And post the pictures.
Zone 5 Brantford,ON
http://durgan.org/2011/
User avatar
Durgan
 
Posts: 1194
Joined: Sep 28, 2007 9:33 pm
Location: Brantford, ON Canada

Postby Durgan » Jun 16, 2008 6:24 pm

http://zuphu.notlong.com/ 16 June 2008 Installing immersion pump to dispense rainfall water.

The plastic barrel is filled by gravity from the two top barrels. The pump pressure is almost the same as city water presssure, so I added a garden hose for dispensing water to the flower beds. The pump float automatically switches the system off when the water is too low in the barrel. Basically the system is still an enclosed reservoir, so no bug screening is required.
Zone 5 Brantford,ON
http://durgan.org/2011/
User avatar
Durgan
 
Posts: 1194
Joined: Sep 28, 2007 9:33 pm
Location: Brantford, ON Canada

Postby David » Jun 16, 2008 11:29 pm

Dear Sir,
I was about to set up a water collecting system when I found yours built on steel posts. I have a couple simple questions. Does the friction alone cause the cable not to slip? You do not show a photo of the over flow that goes from the back on to the ground in the black tubeing. How is it fastened to the barrel. You say insects are unable to get in, but yet it appears to me they can get in at the water point of entry via the down spout and the over flow on the front of the same barrel. What is your means of allowing air to escape from the second barrel and not develope an air pocket.
I think your ideas are great and your photos are very clear. I know I can fill in the information I have asked, but I hate to reinvent the wheel! I would rather work on new problems! David
User avatar
David
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Jun 16, 2008 11:12 pm

Postby Durgan » Jun 17, 2008 5:13 am

David wrote:Dear Sir,
I was about to set up a water collecting system when I found yours built on steel posts. I have a couple simple questions. Does the friction alone cause the cable not to slip? You do not show a photo of the over flow that goes from the back on to the ground in the black tubeing. How is it fastened to the barrel. You say insects are unable to get in, but yet it appears to me they can get in at the water point of entry via the down spout and the over flow on the front of the same barrel. What is your means of allowing air to escape from the second barrel and not develope an air pocket.
I think your ideas are great and your photos are very clear. I know I can fill in the information I have asked, but I hate to reinvent the wheel! I would rather work on new problems! David


Cables on the steel posts. There are nipples on the posts, which catch the steel cables. This increases the friction, plus the angle of the inverted arch tightens around the post when the barrels are full. The loops should just fit over the post. I have kicked, moved, shaken, the structure and the barrels don't move, particularly when they are full. Empty, some slipping is possible. Avoid the fence post without nipples. I am contemplating placing U clamps around the posts below the cable loops, simply as a precaution to eliminate the possibility of cable slippage, but have seen no necessity for such so far.

The black plastic tubing is the system used to take the over-flow from the downspout before I installed the catch system. This will be reconnected for Winter use, and the barrels disconnected from the downspout. It is just being stored there for now.

The barrel over-flow is the large bung hole, which is left open during a rain storm. One could install a pipe on this to lead the water further away from the house, but I just let it spill on the ground where it falls, since it is about 7 feet from the house.

During rest periods when not using the system, the bung holes are kept with the plugs in place. This effectively seals the second barrel completely, and the only inlet to the first barrel is the downspout feed. If any insect wants to craw into the narrow gap between the feed pipe and the edge of the hole, be my guest. A quick shake of the barrel will make life miserable for any beast so inclined.

The large bung plug is removed to let air into the second barrel when filling and draining. Just leaving it loose in the hole is sufficient.

The second barrel is filled by the drain bungs fittings connected together with a garden hose. The water will quickly go to the same level above ground in each barrel. More barrels could be cascaded.

I installed the sump pumping system, simply so the water doesn't have to be carried in a bucket, but I still use the watering-can for many applications.

One could modify to suit any particular need. This water is great for ponds and won't kill fish as quickly as the city supplied, clorinated water.

Any reasonable holding tank could be used, but barrels are cheap, readily available, have bung holes that are standard sizes, and easy to move around or disassemble if necessary, and effectively sealed from insects. And everybody thinks you are "Green".
Zone 5 Brantford,ON
http://durgan.org/2011/
User avatar
Durgan
 
Posts: 1194
Joined: Sep 28, 2007 9:33 pm
Location: Brantford, ON Canada

Postby David » Jun 17, 2008 4:08 pm

Dear Mr. Durgan,
My what a quick response. I like your ideas. We were thinking along the same line on most of the ideas, but like I said I wanted to hear your version. Sounds as if you have been doing this for a while. I live in Iowa and grew up on a farm. I now live in town. I am very sad to say like so many family farms ours is in the process of being sold, as we write. I hope you keep coming up with the good ideas and continue to share those ideas with others. Our home, earth, can use the help!
Thankyou very much,
Sincerely,
David[/b]
User avatar
David
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Jun 16, 2008 11:12 pm

Postby Durgan » Jun 17, 2008 8:15 pm

David wrote:Dear Mr. Durgan,
My what a quick response. I like your ideas. We were thinking along the same line on most of the ideas, but like I said I wanted to hear your version. Sounds as if you have been doing this for a while. I live in Iowa and grew up on a farm. I now live in town. I am very sad to say like so many family farms ours is in the process of being sold, as we write. I hope you keep coming up with the good ideas and continue to share those ideas with others. Our home, earth, can use the help!
Thankyou very much,
Sincerely,
David[/b]


I was born in a log cabin like Abe Lincoln on a 160 acre Homestead in Carrot River, Saskatchewan, as far North as one can go and grow wheat. I sold my soul to make a living to raise a family in the modern world, now retired I can get a bit of my childhood back. I am always more comfortable in the bush than in the city. I must admit the effort is less than on the homestead, utilizing some of the modern power tools. Running water, electricity, flush toilets, and a thermostat reduce the amount of daily work considerably.
Zone 5 Brantford,ON
http://durgan.org/2011/
User avatar
Durgan
 
Posts: 1194
Joined: Sep 28, 2007 9:33 pm
Location: Brantford, ON Canada

Postby Durgan » Jun 21, 2008 4:48 pm

http://uawae.notlong.com 21 June 2008 Practical Rainwater Collection System Construction Details.
Zone 5 Brantford,ON
http://durgan.org/2011/
User avatar
Durgan
 
Posts: 1194
Joined: Sep 28, 2007 9:33 pm
Location: Brantford, ON Canada

Postby Durgan » Jun 22, 2008 11:31 am

http://ajoosh.notlong.com/ 22 June 2008 Transporting Barrel Rainwater.

I got tired of carrying pails of water to the plants, so decided to improve the effort by using the wheelbarrel. With a little care spilling is minimal. The watering labour was reduced considerably.
Zone 5 Brantford,ON
http://durgan.org/2011/
User avatar
Durgan
 
Posts: 1194
Joined: Sep 28, 2007 9:33 pm
Location: Brantford, ON Canada

Postby Durgan » Jun 24, 2008 7:32 pm

http://aejak.notlong.com/ 24 May 2008 Downspout Crimping Tool.

A downspout crimping tool was received today (Internet) , after I have completed the rainbarrel project. this tool is almost essential when dealing with dowspouts, since often connections must be made with pipes of the same size to insure the water flows inside the pipes. Without the tool connections are difficult. Don't attempt the project with out it.
Zone 5 Brantford,ON
http://durgan.org/2011/
User avatar
Durgan
 
Posts: 1194
Joined: Sep 28, 2007 9:33 pm
Location: Brantford, ON Canada

PreviousNext

Return to Garden Projects and Ideas

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

Follow Style At Home Online

Facebook Activity

Contests

Latest Contests

more contests