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Natto-making at home.

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Natto-making at home.

Postby Durgan » Dec 14, 2008 11:46 am

Natto- Home Making.
Natto is considered to be a fine human food. Normally it is commercially produced. Deciding to make it at home, this is my method. Natto is fermented whole soy beans, which is very common in Japan.

http://www.durgan.org/ShortURL/?BGGIL 14 December 2008 Natto Making at Home

Select about 500 ml of dried soy beans, was thoroughly, boil for ten minutes in water, discard this water, and rinse thoroughly. Place beans in colander and place in pressure cooker. The colander is necessary to prevent the beans from touching the water, and boiling up and clogging the exhaust valve. The beans are cooked by the steam formed. Cook for about 1.5 hours. This insures the beans are soft and well cooked. Mix the spores with molasses, salt, and water at about 60 degrees centigrade and about 200 ml of water, and stir into the cooked soy beans mixing thoroughly. Spread the beans on a tray, not too thick, cover with plastic wrap and punch some holes in the material, and place in the incubator for about 24 hours.

I eat a small bowlful for breakfast daily, along with a dish of cooked rolled oats. Five hundred ml of dried beans is about a weeks supply for one person. Keep in a normal manner in the refrigerator. When making, use hot water and heat to keep the working area as clean as possible to limit the introduction of airborne spores. Maximum spore temperature is 60 degrees C, and the incubator is set to about 40 degrees C.

The incubator is a normal camping thermo box, and the heat is supplied by a drug store heating pad. The process is dead simple, and takes little time and effort. I find the end product very pleasant to ingest. Fermented soy beans, disarm all the detrimental effects about eating whole soy beans, judging by current literature.

Spores are available on the Internet, but much cheaper if you can get them sent from Japan. A small vial is sufficient for making many kilograms of Natto. The vial keeps in a sealed container in the refrigerator for long periods.
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Re: Natto-making at home.

Postby DonnaZn2SK » Dec 14, 2008 11:56 pm

Durgan,

Reading Anthony Bourdain's description of natto in his book A Cook's Tour means that I will never try these little nuggets, no matter how healthful they may be.

From page 152:

"The Japanese love natto, an unbelievably foul, rank, slimy, glutenous and stringy goop of fermented soybeans. It's the Vegemite of Japan, dearly loved by everyone there, for reasons no outsider can understand."

Perhaps the homemade version is more palatable...
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Re: Natto-making at home.

Postby Katherine » Dec 15, 2008 12:24 am

Durgan, I am sure you must find something good about this, but I think I will stick with peanutbutter on toast and a glass of orangejuice.

Fair play to you, though.

Kat
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Re: Natto-making at home.

Postby Durgan » Dec 15, 2008 6:27 am

Possibly the Japanese have discovered a food, that has nutrition benefits beyond most other foods, available to all, relatively low in cost, and from plants.

It would be interesting to compare a bowl of Natto to a Big Mac or two eggs, toast, and bacon as to nutritional requirements. I just had my breakfast and it was bowl of Natto and a bowl of rolled oats, and a glass of blended fruit. I will only eat one more meal later in the day.

The learned scholar who wrote the description of Natto is close, but this substance may easily be disguised in various recipes to satisfy any palate.

To my casual observation eating food with the main criteria is that it tastes good is slowing killing people in most of the Western world. This is based on the obesity epidemic -assuming most people believe this is a major problem.

Continuing further. A meat based diet is only available to a rich country. The ratio of input utilizing meat is about 25 to 1. Meaning it takes the equivalent of 25 units of land to produce one unit of food of marginal benefit. This land could be utilized in growing soy beans or something similar and the food directly ingested by humans without feeding an inefficient animal, then eating the flesh of the animal. The ratio of land to food then drops to around one to one. The "Greens" might note this fact.

Fifty year ago, I was aware of the dangers of the Western diet, and decided to do something about it, with some success. Fortunately, I traveled a lot and looked around to see what other peoples were ingesting. Also, when my desired food is not present, I eat what is available. My criteria today is to generally eat food that is necessary to maintain good health. Food to me is not a soother. This does not mean that I don't eat "treats" or gourmet food periodically in a social setting.

Unfortunately with food, other than too large a quantity, if not of quality produces insidious harmful effects over time. Humans usually consider only the immediate harmful effects, and completely ignore the long term hazards. A food disease, if such exists, which is 30 years in the future is of little concern. The attitude is one can visit the local Doctor, who will prescribe a pill to alleviate the misery caused by a lifetime of ingesting quantities of poor quality food.

I think even the most assiduous doubter will arrive at the conclusion that there has to be something wrong with what we commonly ingest. The book stands are full of diet books. Loosing excessive weight is a full blown industry, often offering simplistic solutions.
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Re: Natto-making at home.

Postby Durgan » Dec 15, 2008 8:53 am

http://www.durgan.org/ShortURL/?MMCQP

This may substantiate my babbling in the previous post. Don't be like many people and look at the picture only, read the text associated.
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Re: Natto-making at home.

Postby Trailblaze1 » Dec 15, 2008 9:02 am

INTERESTING!....Durgan, your posts always amaze me. You sure do work hard to find wonderful foods to eat.May you live as long and as healthily as you seem determined to be!

but I could never even bring myself to taste those cobwebby beans.
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Re: Natto-making at home.

Postby Durgan » Dec 15, 2008 12:43 pm

Trailblaze1 wrote:INTERESTING!....Durgan, your posts always amaze me. You sure do work hard to find wonderful foods to eat.May you live as long and as healthily as you seem determined to be!

but I could never even bring myself to taste those cobwebby beans.


My interest is not the elixir of life but some simple food(s) that is healthy and sustainable over a period of time, with little effort and at low cost, and small volume, and reasonable satisfying to the palate.

Camping and traveling and living on the road for periods of up to a month, I have found that certain foods can meet this requirement. Obviously it is easier to have these food at home. Away from home sometimes substitutes have to be incorporated, due to my typical foods not being available..

The sustainable foods at home are: cooked rolled oats, beans (soy), sardines, blended plant food, nuts, the odd bun, two or three eggs per week, a bit of milk, and minimum sweetener. I find my food preparation time is a few minutes per day, and my health is excellent, and weight is constant with being careful about the quantities consumed.

When eating for social purposes, I cut down on food the day before and sometimes the day after to keep my weight constant.

The above may appear to be bland, but I have learned to eat to live not live to eat, for what it's worth. I am not dogmatic about food, and ingest almost anything. I received this yesterday and it tends to suggest that my diet has some validity, again for what it is worth.
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Re: Natto-making at home.

Postby butterfly » Dec 15, 2008 7:30 pm

I;ll stick to my rolled oats cooked cereal or toast and peanut butter and glass of milk

I dont think I could handle Natto for any meal

I think there is a very small precentage of the population who eats for breakfast the Big Mac or two eggs, toast, and bacon or Natto for that matter for breakfast to do a proper comparison for nutritional value between the two
Cheers Butterfly




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