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Fresh from the oven

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Re: Fresh from the oven

Postby Eeyore » Dec 16, 2008 12:40 am

Well this discussion piqued my interest so I had to go looking for an answer and this is what I found! Apparently there are some other starches (potato is mantioned in one article I read) that help as well. Gluten is what causes most breads to trap gases and rise but when that isn't available something else has to take it's place. As Inge mentioned, in some breads eggs, baking powder or soda is used but in the case of a "sandwich bread" that wouldn't be sufficient. You'd end up with a heavy, dense loaf like a sweet bread.
Carol can probably attest that in general gluten free loaves are a bit heavier and denser and don't generally rise as high as a "wheat" loaf. I suppose that might be dependent upon how much Xanthan gum is added to the flours, just as the height of a wheat loaf is dependent on a number of factors as well. Interesting discussion.

OTGF - part gardening, part science.... :?

How is it used (Xanthan gum) in Gluten-Free baking?

If you have ever made your own bread, you would appreciate the magic that wheat gluten brings to the party. It is what gives the stretch to the dough and is that which allows bubbles to form in the bread as gases are produced by the yeast. Without gluten, the gases are not trapped into gluten surrounded bubbles, and the bread is flat and, well, not really bread-like at all. Obviously, gluten-free means you do not have gluten. Xanthan gum replaces gluten by providing the viscosity to the batter to trap the gases, forming the airy texture you want in bread.
Lyn
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Re: Fresh from the oven

Postby Lizcordysmum » Dec 16, 2008 12:52 am

Hey, at least it turned OUT and looks deliciously edible, Ron.

I spent this afternoon futilely trying to make Rosemary crackers. Wheat flour, organic white flour...salt, olive oil, water.

Food processor...stuff did not form a ball. Attempted to form ball by hand. Knead gently, 10 - 12 times. HAH. Covered somewhat diamond-shaped lump with plastic wrap for 1/2 hour as requested.

Time to roll out to 1/8th inch thickness. HAH.

The more I rolled it, flattened it, the more it shrunk back into itself (kitchen was warm enough) Finally admitted defeat, and thought okay, 1/4 inch thick crackers.

Spent some time digging tree shapes out of little cutter. Achieved FOUR Christmas trees.

Was exhausted by this time, so tossed entire MESS into the garbage, and cleaned up work surfaces.

If Polly wants a cracker, Polly better know how to make them him/herself!
Cordy's Mum, Liz
Rain Coast, BC Zone 7b/8a


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Re: Fresh from the oven

Postby bluebird » Dec 16, 2008 11:11 am

Eeyore wrote:Carol can probably attest that in general gluten free loaves are a bit heavier and denser and don't generally rise as high as a "wheat" loaf.


Hey YOU :lol: ! Not so! I've made my share of high and light airy GF bread with a fine texture over the years that could stand side by side with pride against any gluten bread around. That said, it is NOT an easy thing to do and takes lots of practice. I've had just as many flops as successes too...some of my bread making flops have been legendary!

I'm on my third breadmachine having worn out the first two as I use it at least once a week. The main difference with making GF bread is the dough is the consistency of thick cream so instead of kneading, you mix, let rise ONCE and then bake. More often than not, the main problem I have is it rises too much and I have to knock it back down a bit.

Making gluten free bread is always an exciting adventure! :lol: But well worth it compared to stuff they sell in stores...flat, dry and boring and usually comes frozen. However, there is a bakery in Simcoe that makes excellent GF breads and they sell at the Hamilton Farmer's market. Velly expensive though!
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Re: Fresh from the oven

Postby butterfly » Dec 16, 2008 1:08 pm

Carol

what happens to a person who eats gultin who is allergic??

How does a person know they can't have it?

just curious, wondering about myself

sugar and caffine is my enemy causes extreme pain if I eat too much

Chocolate is a no no

I do get away with a couple of Mars bars a week but after 3-4 weeks of them I really suffer. But there is not much chocolate on them

I need a kick in the head I know but I seem to crave sugar by times and I don't use it in any other forms

I don't eat white flour goods at all but wondered about glutin made products
Cheers Butterfly




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Re: Fresh from the oven

Postby Eeyore » Dec 16, 2008 1:21 pm

Carol - thanks for the info. I've never seen a homemade gluten loaf so I made a rather bold assumption. Sowee! :oops: I DID read that it was tricky to make a gluten free bread and that it was quite common for it to fail until you learned the technique.

BF - Carol can answer better than I can, but from my understanding many people don't realize that they are celiac because they don't assume that gluten is the problem. It's often found by trial and error and experimenting with diet. Until fairly recently it was one of those below the radar disorders that was thought to be more rare than it is. I don't know if there is a "test" for it? Carol?
Lyn
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Re: Fresh from the oven

Postby bluebird » Dec 16, 2008 3:59 pm

Eeyore wrote:Carol - thanks for the info. I've never seen a homemade gluten loaf so I made a rather bold assumption. Sowee! :oops: I DID read that it was tricky to make a gluten free bread and that it was quite common for it to fail until you learned the technique.


:wink: Just pulling yer pins Lyn. It's a common assumption that one can't possibly make a good GF loaf. Someone on this forum (an occasional visitor) even suggested my GF bread "must be nasty" lol! Nothing could be further from the truth and I think that my own homemade bread is likely heatlhier than most store bought as it only contains fresh natural ingredients and no preservatives.
Yes, technique is a big part of it, which is why I can't just write out the recipe and assume that someone else would have success. My Mom taught me how...success just comes from practice. ie: the batter has to "look" right-lol.

butterfly wrote:Carol

what happens to a person who eats gultin who is allergic??

How does a person know they can't have it?


BF, before people knew what this condition was, they used to call it "The Wasting Disease" as one would literally waste away and die. It's a genetic condition so it runs in families. My Dad, Aunt, Uncle, several cousins and my sister all have it. It comes from my Dad's side. We celiacs lack the ability to digest gluten. If we do eat it, it destroys one's digestive system over time so that you can't get any nutrition from your food and then because your immune system is weakened you end up all sickly and weak. Usually then something else would "get you" and finish you off.
But it's quite simple to solve...all one has to do is to completely eliminate gluten from their diet. I'm so used to it that it is no problem at all anymore. We can even order from gluten free menus in some restaurants and one restaurant here even has a chef who is a celiac.

Gluten free pasta is available at most supermarkets these days, made from brown rice flour and other GF grains. As I mentioned before, it is a very healthy diet as one must avoid processed foods, junk food. Gluten is hidden in many foods, even some ketchup and ice-cream and most canned soups has it as well. So, you learn to eat food in its more natural state just to be safe. And, that is a healthy way to eat.

To diagnose all one needs is a simple blood test. More info via this link: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/38085.php
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Re: Fresh from the oven

Postby Katherine » Dec 16, 2008 4:44 pm

Thanks Carol. I really appreciate this explanation. And I would like to have a recipe and the technique for a GF bread, if you know of a site or have a recipe, bearing in my mind your advice regarding practice and learning the technique.

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