Over the Garden Fence - Gardening Forums

question for Lulu

Pull up a chair and grab a cup of Java for a cozy chat about what's on your mind and what's happening in your neck of the woods. This is a strictly for fun non-gardening topics.

question for Lulu

Postby Northpine » Nov 17, 2012 9:14 pm

I didn't want to sidetrack the other thread, so I'll ask my question here.

Here's an excerpt from Lulu's post:
"My hooligans, George and Gracie (just turned two last month) are perfect listeners now! The secret,,,in September, we got an off leash dog park here in Sudbury. I've taken them every single day and we're all loving it; they finally realize they are dogs, not people! The biggest benefit is that they are much more relaxed, not so much horseplay in the house, and as I said,,are really good listeners, for everything. They are just happy, happy dogs these days. The other secret is that I discovered "halties", which makes them walk like little soldiers."

Can you explain to me what halties are. I would love to have my little lunatic walking like a little soldier! At this time he is racing along the path with me tumbling along behind, and when I get going at a reasonable pace, he stops dead and just about rips my arm out of joint. I use a halter and a retractable leash which he manages to tangle in his legs. These walks are leaving a lot to be desired!
Marie
Zone 1b, Northern MB
One of the most delightful things about a garden is the anticipation it provides. ~W.E. Johns, The Passing Show
User avatar
Northpine
 
Posts: 709
Joined: Aug 12, 2007 10:53 pm
Location: Zone 1b, Northern MB

Re: question for Lulu

Postby Heidi S » Nov 18, 2012 12:45 am

Marie, I used a halti to train both my dogs to walk politely. It is a collar with a strap that goes over the nose and feeds through to the leash hook. When the dog lunges, they pull their own nose down to their chest, which they don't like - although it doesn't hurt them at all. I will use one on ever new pup/dog I ever have to deal with from now on. Great to use while working on the heel and stay close commands. I could stop using it after about 18 months of age as they both had learn to avoid getting their noses pulled.

I got mine from a local pet store, which had them in several sizes.

Halti_Headcollar.jpg
Last edited by Heidi S on Nov 18, 2012 12:58 am, edited 2 times in total.
Heidi S,
Prince George, BC
Zone 3!

Master Gardener in Training....
User avatar
Heidi S
 
Posts: 803
Joined: Jun 22, 2010 3:45 pm

Re: question for Lulu

Postby Heidi S » Nov 18, 2012 12:54 am

Marie, another problem you are having is that you are using the retractable leash - for training only use a 4 or 6 ft leash, and never let the dog leave your side. If he is doing his business, you stand beside him. Being on the long leash makes him think you just along for the ride, vs. being the boss.

If he is attached directly to you, and you have a firm grip all the time, (with the halti in particular), he will learn the manners you are looking for. This is also when you are using treats to reward the good behavior, along with the encouraging voice saying 'Good Boy" as you give him one kibble or treat. It is a timing thing at first, because you are trying to treat as he does the right thing, and their attention span is so short.

If you have any kind of puppy or dog classes available, you should try some and get some feedback on why he is taking control, and how to correct it. A dog that is allowed to ramble along not really realizing he is actually attached to you, is an untrained dog and you will never achieve manners you like.

Here we have a local dog agility club that does basic training for everyone, because that is the first step to having a dog that can compete in trials, maybe you have something similar there.
Heidi S,
Prince George, BC
Zone 3!

Master Gardener in Training....
User avatar
Heidi S
 
Posts: 803
Joined: Jun 22, 2010 3:45 pm

Re: question for Lulu

Postby Northpine » Nov 18, 2012 12:35 pm

Thanks so much. I'll look for one of those. I live in a small town, so not much available in dog training or agility classes around here.
You're absolutely right though, I can see that my dog is totally doing his own thing. I have no control.
Marie
Zone 1b, Northern MB
One of the most delightful things about a garden is the anticipation it provides. ~W.E. Johns, The Passing Show
User avatar
Northpine
 
Posts: 709
Joined: Aug 12, 2007 10:53 pm
Location: Zone 1b, Northern MB

Re: question for Lulu

Postby Heidi S » Nov 18, 2012 1:25 pm

Training a dog is like training a toddler - firm and consistent gets the behaviour you want, eventually. On the short leash, I allow mine to sniff and stop briefly, but then give the command 'Come' and pull firmly to bring her along side of me again. As she does, she gets that little treat to confirm the good behaviour along with the 'Good Girl' voice acknowledgement. Leash in one hand, kibble in the other, delivered quickly and directly to the mouth.

These days, (she is 5+ years old now), she is usually off leash because she is very good, but when she stops listening, and doesn't keep up to my pace too often, she goes back on for a few days, and then she is good as gold. I still bring a few treats and she continues to keep a very close eye on that pocket - food is the ultimate motivator for dogs. Pavlov's Dogs is true - they will do almost anything for the reward. And yes, I adjust her daily meals to allow for the treats so she doesn't get fat.

Since you are not able to find puppy classes to help you, you can probably find DVD's or youtube programs that can give you the same ideas, or some books in a library to help you out. Not as easy as taking a class, but a place to start. I will always go back to a class with mine, because with the time span between new dogs, and the different temperaments, it helps to have someone else observing and giving advice, which I welcome.

Your dear little dog will not 'love' the change in regime, but will get used to it, and utimately they will do anything to keep you happy once they realize that is what you want, cause you are the boss!
Heidi S,
Prince George, BC
Zone 3!

Master Gardener in Training....
User avatar
Heidi S
 
Posts: 803
Joined: Jun 22, 2010 3:45 pm

Re: question for Lulu

Postby Northpine » Nov 18, 2012 1:47 pm

Heidi S wrote:Your dear little dog will not 'love' the change in regime, but will get used to it, and utimately they will do anything to keep you happy once they realize that is what you want, cause you are the boss!


Yeah, I'm already anticipating a rebellion of sorts, since he's been allowed to run in every direction. But I've had good success in calming him before walks by making him sit for a reward. Before that he was such a ball of excitement it was ridiculous! So he's very familiar with what's in my pocket now.
Marie
Zone 1b, Northern MB
One of the most delightful things about a garden is the anticipation it provides. ~W.E. Johns, The Passing Show
User avatar
Northpine
 
Posts: 709
Joined: Aug 12, 2007 10:53 pm
Location: Zone 1b, Northern MB

Re: question for Lulu

Postby Lulu » Nov 18, 2012 8:23 pm

Hi, Marie,,sorry,,was out of town, yesterday and today, but, fortunately, Heidi provided you with a great response and a picture of the haltie.

My hooligans did not resent or object to the haltie one bit, and the difference in their behaviors, from the first second they were on, was extreme!

My dog friends have given me two reasons they work; the first says that they pull/run/yank,,(or pull us into the mud ditch), with their "body" strength, but the haltie makes them have to use their "head" strength, which is just their undeveloped neck muscles. She believes it changes their brain chemistry?

The second one says that mother dogs correct them by putting pressure on the bridge of their noses, and the haltie does that same thing, even though it is not tight.

I do not know how it works; I will just accept that it is a miracle, with these two, and I am loving that they are perfectly behaved dogs, rather than savage hooligans, dragging me behind them. All the doggie parents @ the park tell similar stories about their dog's unruliness, prior to the using the halti, and total co-operation, after. And, great danes, rotties, dobbies, and all breeds react exactly the same!

They were really good dogs, as long as they were not on a leash, which is what made me hesitate about taking them to obedience class; I just could not imagine being pulled all over the classroom, by them!
User avatar
Lulu
 
Posts: 2289
Joined: Nov 16, 2008 8:13 pm

Re: question for Lulu

Postby Northpine » Nov 18, 2012 11:45 pm

I am going on a mission tomorrow to see if I can find one in town. If not I will order one.
'Savage hooligan' is an apt description, Lulu, of what I'm coping with.
I'm excited to try this with my dog! He is a joy for us, but not on his walks.
A bonus of having him behave on the leash might also be that I can prevent him from eating every thing he can pick up. But that's another issue.
Marie
Zone 1b, Northern MB
One of the most delightful things about a garden is the anticipation it provides. ~W.E. Johns, The Passing Show
User avatar
Northpine
 
Posts: 709
Joined: Aug 12, 2007 10:53 pm
Location: Zone 1b, Northern MB

Re: question for Lulu

Postby Northpine » Nov 21, 2012 12:13 pm

I tried a short leash last evening and again this morning and can't believe how much better Jack's doing already. This morning I had to keep checking that he was still with me, as there was no tension on the leash. He only tried to cross in front of me twice. I am excited.
I did find a Halti, but it was the wrong size...the halter in the package was different than the size indicated on the outside, so I have to return it for exchange. However they had a very limited selection and I might not be able to get the right one. But with the progress we're making, I may not even need it.

Thanks again Lulu and Heidi for your instructions.
Marie
Zone 1b, Northern MB
One of the most delightful things about a garden is the anticipation it provides. ~W.E. Johns, The Passing Show
User avatar
Northpine
 
Posts: 709
Joined: Aug 12, 2007 10:53 pm
Location: Zone 1b, Northern MB

Re: question for Lulu

Postby Heidi S » Nov 21, 2012 10:16 pm

Hey Marie - glad to hear you and Jack are making progress already. My friends who are into dog training in a big way tell me that most people who have trouble walking their dogs are using those retractable leashes. They just don't work for training dogs because they allow so much free range activity. Training has to be done with short leashes to connect the dog to the person and allow the communication to happen.

As I have found, once the dog has grown up mentally (around the age of 2) you can allow them to run more freely - mine go off leash in the wild areas, and on leash on the road. I stopped using the halti when the dog didn't tug anymore. My dogs have been lab crosses, and labs are notorious lungers, especially when still in their youth. Once the dog is older, you can use the retractable then to give more range. However, I still use my short leash for the road areas, because I need to have control in emergency situations. My dog walks so nicely, she really doesn't need the leash, but I don't want her startled and scared onto the road in a crisis.

I hope you and Jack develop a great relationship for walking for many years to come!
Heidi S,
Prince George, BC
Zone 3!

Master Gardener in Training....
User avatar
Heidi S
 
Posts: 803
Joined: Jun 22, 2010 3:45 pm

Next

Return to Over the Garden Fence

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests

cron

Follow Style At Home Online

Facebook Activity

Contests

Latest Contests

more contests