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Starting Veg. Mid summer

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Starting Veg. Mid summer

Postby LieutenantPickles » Jul 10, 2010 10:02 pm

I just arrived back in Ottawa after a four month working holiday on organic farms in the East Coast. I'm itching to start my own veggie garden but I unfortunately have much less space than the farms and have no seedlings started. I figure tomatoes and beans are out this year but what other plants might I be able to start to grow mid July in pots?
I'm starting from scratch so any other helpful hints would be greatly appreciated!!!
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Re: Starting Veg. Mid summer

Postby kelly_m » Jul 11, 2010 3:35 pm

Actually, bush beans are still doable...with the heat they'll germinate in no time and it doesn't take long for them to fruit...er..vegetable.

Onions, peas, lettuce are other options, and of course anything under the soil...carrots, Potatoes (garbage can works!) will take you into the cooler weather.

Maybe you can see if any nurseries have tomatoes on clearance....they may be leggy, but if you have a deep pot you can plant them up to thier first leaves.....there's probably enough nice weather left for you to get some. they may be a little later but better late than never!!

Good luck!
Kelly
Zone 5a/b


OLD GARDENERS NEVER DIE. THEY JUST SPADE AWAY
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Re: Starting Veg. Mid summer

Postby VictorianNoire » Aug 03, 2010 10:46 am

well in a couple week would be the perfect time to do fall veggies. we are just starting to get them in at the nursery. these include things like lettuces, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower...anything that likes the cooler weather.

for the most part (except the lettuces, which you should be eating by early winter) will grow up until a certain point, then go dormant over the cold winter months and then keep growing during the melt, so you will have them by early spring. over wintering veggies takes a lot of patience, but reaps great reward!
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