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Re: New plants

Postby davefrombc » Oct 17, 2009 12:54 pm

Pineapples are very easy to grow. Take the top off a super market pineapple, include a little of the flesh . Then pull off the flesh to the core and about an inch of the bottom leaves. Let it dry and callus for a day and plant in good potting soil. Keep it moist , but not wet .
I have also started pineapples by just cutting the top off with a bit of the pineapple left on to hold it up and placed in a dish with some support for the leaves. I kept the bottom with the meat and a bit of the stem covered in water , and as the meat rotted , the stem developed rootlets; and from there the plant was potted up as usual. Given sun and a very large pot, the pineapple will grow into a large plant, and in about 2 years or so produce a pineapple .Pineapple plants only produce one fruit and then declines and dies. However,
you can use the top for another generation; and if the plant is maintained, daughter plants will develop from the base as the parent plant dies back. Here is a picture of the parent plant with a daughter plant growing from its base, and ready to be transplanted to its own pot.
This pineapple was grown in a 6" pot on a west facing windowsill.
Image
BC Fraser Valley zone 7/8
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Re: New plants

Postby Eeyore » Oct 17, 2009 9:36 pm

Thanks Dave, I'll give it a try.
Lyn
AB, Zone 3A
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Re: New plants

Postby Lulu » Oct 18, 2009 8:54 am

Dave, I too, love the unusual plants and have grown or tried to grow a lot of different things. I have, in the past, grown a pineapple plant from the stump, but this time, I got a little pineapple plant @ Rona, about a month ago, on clearance, for $6.00. Have to admit, I have been ignoring it, as I've been busy hauling stuff in from outdoors, so, a few of the leaves are dried out.

At the time, the pineapple was very green, but has since turned yellow, but for whatever reason, I didn't think it would be edible; figured it was an ornamental plant only??

I've also bought a coconut plant at that same Rona, and again, on clearance; kept it alive for over two years, but, it succumbed, due to neglect, around the time of my son's wedding last year. Saw them again this time @ Rona, but, they weren't on sale, ,so, , no go!
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Re: New plants

Postby Eeyore » Oct 18, 2009 11:12 pm

Way too cool Lulu! :o Gonna have to try this! Hubby wants to grow a coconut.
Lyn
AB, Zone 3A
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Re: New plants

Postby orchidguy » Oct 30, 2009 12:13 am

Great collection of plants Dave

although quite easy to grow, your Camellia sinensis plants are going to need a deep pot. They have almost a tap root to them, and quickly outgrow their pots vertically (I hope that made sense)
Always look forward to your posts, and your new conquests in the plant world.
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Re: New plants

Postby Jeannie » Dec 08, 2009 4:18 pm

When making remarks about a plant, one is usually speaking of normal size, or at least a size that befits the average home, perhaps a windowsill or table. But when confronted by pictures such as you show, it puts a whole new light on the matter.
Those things are beautiful, and look to be in VERY good health. A cup or two of brew I offered --then I see we're talking about inviting the koffee klatch over for a tea.

Most definitely, a solarium can help..
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Re: New plants

Postby neng_perea » Mar 27, 2010 2:12 am

Dave, your very patient and a good gardener.Thank you for sharing maybe someday I will try too.

Lulu, your coconut tree need to plant the whole coconut cover with soil but still Okay for a while. I have some pictures to share.
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This picture was taken in Corrigidor Island, those are Coconut tree.
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Grow taller like this.
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This was taken in Philippines 1988, my motor boat.
IMG_0281.JPG
Sept. 2007
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I was born in this community called Munting Mapino in english Small Fine.
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Re: New plants

Postby ViridianFields » Apr 09, 2010 1:39 am

I've been keeping my eye open for one of the true dwarf citrus trees, I read an article about them a few years ago and the only cultivar I can remember the name of was the 'Improved Meyer' lemon, but there was a tangerine, orange, lime, and kumquat mentioned in the article also.

I'm considering growing cape gooseberries indoors, and have strawberry seedlings in the bay window right now. Maybe I'll pot a few of those and try them on the windowsill this winter, hmm...
Calvin

Creighton, SK - Zone 1b, but don't tell the Delphiniums. Zone 4 for them. :lol:
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Re: New plants

Postby davefrombc » Apr 09, 2010 1:55 pm

Haven't posted for quite a while .. My cacao didn't appreciate the chill in the solarium and died when it dropped to 7C ( 45 F) during the few cold snaps we had last winter. The tea, coffee, avocado and other tropicals all take those minimums ok , but unfortunately cacao isn't as hardy, so anything under about 15 C (60 F) will severely harm or kill it . Soooo.. Gotta write off cacao in my solarium .. It's just too expensive to maintain it at 15 C minimums in winter.
The Meyer lemon is a good dwarf citrus for windowsill growing .. There is a dwarf Kumquat , but I can't tell you the name. You can also grow Key Lime, Bearss Lime and Kaffir limes ( Kaffir lime leaves are used in several Asian cooking recipes)
The most common dwarf orange found in nurseries is the Calamondin orange. It's fruit is small and tart , but edible and can be made into jam or marmalades.
One interesting lemon ( actually a citron/lemon hybrid) is the Ponderosa lemon.. It grows huge , but very mild fruit the size of grapefruit . The biggest Ponderosa lemon weighed 5 pounds ( a little over 2.2 Kg)
BC Fraser Valley zone 7/8
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