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Do I deadhead a snowball?

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Do I deadhead a snowball?

Postby countrychic » Jun 12, 2008 12:34 pm

My snowball Viburnum is done with its flowers. Do I deadhead them, or will this mean no berries later?
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Re: Do I deadhead a snowball?

Postby butterfly » Jun 12, 2008 1:24 pm

countrychic wrote:My snowball Viburnum is done with its flowers. Do I deadhead them, or will this mean no berries later?


I deadhead my shrubs to make them look neater


I never noticed berries on my snowball. Maybe that is why I haven't

don't know if dead heading them causes them not to have berries

Good question to ask cause I didn't know they had berries
Cheers Butterfly




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Having both - is a blessing."--Donna Hedges
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Postby Durgan » Jun 12, 2008 4:49 pm

Viburnum opulus 'Roseum' European Snowball Bush.

If this is the type being discussed, the bush is sterile.

Pruning Snowball Bushes
Question: When is the best time to prune snowball bushes?
Answer: The name snowball bush is applied to several plants, the Japanese Snowball and Chinese Snowball and the European Snowball, which are all viburnum varieties. Japanese and Chinese Snowballs bloom in spring and their flowers often remain for up to three weeks. European Snowball, an old fashioned variety, is subject to attacks of disfiguring plant lice so is not as desirable. In general, spring flowering plants bloom from buds formed the previous season. Any serious pruning is done just after flowering, so the plant can set buds for the following year. Sometimes a little light trimming can be done during the dormant season. Most viburnums don't need much pruning. When they get overgrown and need thinning, the oldest trunks can be cut off at the ground , and the younger, more vigorous shoots left to grow on. Most are big shrubs. When they get too large, they sometimes need to be cut back, although this may destroy the graceful shape of the shrub. Occasionally , when shrubs get too tangled and overgrown, they can be renewed by being completely cut back to the ground in spring ( after enjoying the flowers) and fertilizer is spread around them on the ground. Sometimes they take two or three years to bloom well again. The English often renew their shrubs in this manner.

http://www.mothersgarden.net/content/Questions.html
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Postby butterfly » Jun 12, 2008 5:58 pm

Durgan wrote:Viburnum opulus 'Roseum' European Snowball Bush.

If this is the type being discussed, the bush is sterile.

Pruning Snowball Bushes
Question: When is the best time to prune snowball bushes?
Answer: The name snowball bush is applied to several plants, the Japanese Snowball and Chinese Snowball and the European Snowball, which are all viburnum varieties. Japanese and Chinese Snowballs bloom in spring and their flowers often remain for up to three weeks. European Snowball, an old fashioned variety, is subject to attacks of disfiguring plant lice so is not as desirable. In general, spring flowering plants bloom from buds formed the previous season. Any serious pruning is done just after flowering, so the plant can set buds for the following year. Sometimes a little light trimming can be done during the dormant season. Most viburnums don't need much pruning. When they get overgrown and need thinning, the oldest trunks can be cut off at the ground , and the younger, more vigorous shoots left to grow on. Most are big shrubs. When they get too large, they sometimes need to be cut back, although this may destroy the graceful shape of the shrub. Occasionally , when shrubs get too tangled and overgrown, they can be renewed by being completely cut back to the ground in spring ( after enjoying the flowers) and fertilizer is spread around them on the ground. Sometimes they take two or three years to bloom well again. The English often renew their shrubs in this manner.

http://www.mothersgarden.net/content/Questions.html


Thank you Durgan

But I don't see anything in here that answers the question
about deadheading and berries unless I have overlooked it



thanks
Cheers Butterfly




Having a place to go - is a home. Having someone to love - is a family.
Having both - is a blessing."--Donna Hedges
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Postby Durgan » Jun 12, 2008 7:09 pm

butterfly wrote:
Durgan wrote:Viburnum opulus 'Roseum' European Snowball Bush.

If this is the type being discussed, the bush is sterile.


http://www.mothersgarden.net/content/Questions.html


Thank you Durgan

But I don't see anything in here that answers the question
about deadheading and berries unless I have overlooked it

thanks


If this is the type being discussed, the bush is sterile. Meaning it doesn't produce berries.
Zone 5 Brantford,ON
http://durgan.org/2011/
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Postby butterfly » Jun 12, 2008 7:13 pm

Durgan wrote:
butterfly wrote:
Durgan wrote:Viburnum opulus 'Roseum' European Snowball Bush.

If this is the type being discussed, the bush is sterile.


http://www.mothersgarden.net/content/Questions.html


Thank you Durgan

But I don't see anything in here that answers the question
about deadheading and berries unless I have overlooked it

thanks



If this is the type being discussed, the bush is sterile. Meaning it doesn't produce berries.




ooops
Oh I didn't see your sentence in your first post

That makes sense. sterile, no berries

thanks
Cheers Butterfly




Having a place to go - is a home. Having someone to love - is a family.
Having both - is a blessing."--Donna Hedges
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Postby murphy » Jun 12, 2008 7:15 pm

now that sounds disgusting....."PLANT LICE"....eeeeewwwwwww :shock:
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Postby Durgan » Jun 12, 2008 8:52 pm

Murphy wrote:now that sounds disgusting....."PLANT LICE"....eeeeewwwwwww :shock:


Infestations depend upon the weather conditions to a great degree. Last year I had many insects on the snowball bush, but his year it is clean. I have seen larger older trees in Brampton, and they seemed immune.
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Postby Pansy » Jun 12, 2008 10:59 pm

As far as i know Snow Ball Bush is the only Viburnum that

doesn't produce berries.Don't prune the other varieties as they

will have berries in the fall,which the birds like.
Pansy
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