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Spiderplant with no baby spiders

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Spiderplant with no baby spiders

Postby elizabeth24 » Feb 19, 2009 5:05 pm

I have a healthy spiderplant that I have had for about five years. I have moved it out of direct sunlight to indirect sunlight and it looks much better. I still have no baby spiders. What am I doing wrong?

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Re: Spiderplant with no baby spiders

Postby Eeyore » Feb 19, 2009 7:22 pm

Spider plants like to be pot bound. Is it in a large pot? It's been my experience that the more crowded they are the more babies they produce.
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Re: Spiderplant with no baby spiders

Postby elizabeth24 » Feb 19, 2009 9:49 pm

Yes Eeyore, my spiderplant is potbound. Indirect lighting seems to make it look better but I still don't know what I am doing wrong.
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Re: Spiderplant with no baby spiders

Postby Eeyore » Feb 19, 2009 11:25 pm

Do you give it fertilizer every once in awhile? If so then I guess I would pot it up a size into some fresh soil and continue watering and fertilizing and see if that helps.
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Re: Spiderplant with no baby spiders

Postby sunkeeper » Apr 15, 2009 10:30 pm

http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/popluar ... plants.htm


Spider Plant Care: Gardening Tips For Spider Plants

By: Nikki Phipps

The spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum) is considered one of the most adaptable of houseplants and the easiest to grow. This plant can grow in a wide range of conditions and suffers from few problems, other than brown tips. The spider plant is so named because of its spider-like plants, or spiderettes, which dangle down from the mother plant like spiders on a web. Available in green or variegated varieties, these spiderettes often start out as small white flowers.

Gardening Tips for Spider Plants and General Spider Plant Care
Caring for spider plants is easy. These tough plants tolerate lots of abuse, making them excellent candidates for newbie gardeners, or those without a green thumb. Provide them with well-drained soil and bright, indirect light and they will flourish. Water them well but do not allow the plants to become too soggy, which can lead to root rot. In fact, spider plants prefer to dry out some between waterings.

When caring for spider plants, also take into account that they enjoy cooler temperatures—around the mid fifties to sixties. Spider plants can also benefit from occasional pruning, cutting them back to the base.

Since spider plants prefer a semi-potbound environment, repot them only when their large, fleshy roots are highly visible and watering is difficult. Spider plants can be easily propagated as well through division of the mother plant or by planting the small spiderettes.


Spider Plant Spiderettes
As daylight increases in spring, spider plants should begin producing flowers, eventually developing into babies, or spider plant spiderettes. This may not always occur, however, as only mature plants with enough stored energy will produce spiderettes. Spiderettes can be rooted in water or soil, but will generally yield more favorable results and a stronger root system when planted in soil.

Ideally, the best method for rooting spider plant spiderettes is by allowing the plantlet to remain attached to the mother plant. Choose a spiderette and place it in a pot of soil near the mother plant. Keep this well watered and once it roots, you can cut it from the mother plant.

Alternatively, you can cut off one of the plantlets, place it in a pot of soil, and water generously. Then place the pot in a ventilated plastic bag and put this in a bright location. Once the spiderette is well rooted, remove from the bag and grow as usual.

Spider Plant Leaves Browning
If you begin to notice spider plant leaves browning, there’s no need for worry. Browning of leaf tips is quite normal and will not harm the plant. This is oftentimes the result of fluoride found in water, which causes salt buildup in the soil. It usually helps to periodically leach plants by giving them a thorough watering to flush out excess salts. Be sure to allow the water to drain out and repeat as needed. It may also help to use distilled water or even rainwater on plants instead of that from the kitchen or outside spigot.
Scarborough,Ont. Zone 6A Lorraine
Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them. ~Bill Vaughn
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Re: Spiderplant with no baby spiders

Postby elizabeth24 » Aug 21, 2009 9:14 pm

What plant looks just like a spiderplant? Maybe thats the problem. In the fall, I am going to buy a spiderplant with the baby spiders on it. :D

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Re: Spiderplant with no baby spiders

Postby sunkeeper » Aug 21, 2009 10:18 pm

That's your best bet to purchase a spiderplant with babies.
Scarborough,Ont. Zone 6A Lorraine
Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them. ~Bill Vaughn
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Re: Spiderplant with no baby spiders

Postby PlantAvenue » Aug 27, 2009 6:27 pm

Hmmm. Mine produced lots of babies last year but hasn't at all this year (same pot, same location). I hadn't given it a second thought until I read your post, but now I'm curious!! lol
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Re: Spiderplant with no baby spiders

Postby sunkeeper » Aug 27, 2009 11:31 pm

I checked my reference book for houseplants. There are three reasons why your spiderplant is not producing babies. (1) too-large pot (2) too much light at night (3) too much fertilizer.

Remedy: Keeping plants slightly root bound increases flowering. Plants bloom and produce offspring in response to short nights. In fall or winter, keep plant in a room where no supplemental lights are used at night for 3 weeks. After 3 weeks, it can be brought back into living areas used at night. Overfertilization also can cause plants to produce lush leaves, but no offspring.
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Re: Spiderplant with no baby spiders

Postby elizabeth24 » Sep 01, 2009 10:39 pm

I think they sold me a plant that looks like a spiderplant, but had the wrong name on it. I have done all the things suggested over a few years to no avail. I once bought a "Jacobs Ladder" so the label said. My neighbor at the time who worked at a very good nursery, told me very politely that it did not look like a Jacobs Ladder. She was right. That is why I am going to buy a spiderplant already with baby spiders on it. :D
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