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2012 Vegetable & Varieties Grow List

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Re: 2012 Vegetable & Varieties Grow List

Postby DonnaZn2SK » Apr 15, 2012 9:33 pm

styric,
Lyn's growing the white patty pan squash too.

Is this the first time growing Purple Prince? I grew it a couple of years ago and didn't like it - flavor was insipid for me. The Sun Sugar is terrific, I'd even go as far to say that it tops the Sun Gold because it is so much more prolific. I only have to grow the one plant to get enough for a steady supply throughout the summer. Too bad we can't save seeds for this variety. When you are buying your herbs, make sure to buy French tarragon rather than Russian (?), it the better of the two.

Chelsea,
Can you give me an update at the end of the season on your spinach? I grow Bloomsdale and it bolts quite readily. I grew the variety Catalina one year and it was really good, haven't been able to locate seeds for it since.
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Re: 2012 Vegetable & Varieties Grow List

Postby CdnChelsea » Apr 15, 2012 11:33 pm

DonnaZn2SK wrote:
Chelsea,
Can you give me an update at the end of the season on your spinach? I grow Bloomsdale and it bolts quite readily. I grew the variety Catalina one year and it was really good, haven't been able to locate seeds for it since.


This plant is new to me too. I have seen it in the grocery stores and wondered how it would taste compared to ordinary spinach. Apparently, it tastes somewhat like asparagus which is ok by me. I love asparagus and since my asparagus will not be ready to pick until next year, the spinach will have to do.
I will post pictures when the spinach is up and in its' prime.

Fyi, here is a excerpt from a website about perpetual spinach:


'Perpetual Spinach Leaf Beet', also known as 'Spinach Beet' Chard, is an heirloom variety. This variety is especially thirsty, but will yield well if well fed. Leaf miners can be a problem, but starting the plants early will help, as they will be large enough to withstand attack when the miners have their season. The outer leave should be picked regularly, and this will encourage the plants to produce more. Chard is a biennial which can usually be cropped for a long season before bolting in its second year. In mild climates the plants should crop right through the winter. Once through its early development, it survives well in water-wise conditions. If it is let to go dry in the first several months however, it will bolt immediately. The steamed stalks taste something like asparagus, but milder and with more water. The plants like nitrogen rich soil with plenty of organic material. Sow from late spring to midsummer, and set seed 1 inch or shallower in rows 30 inches apart. Keep the young plants growing well with plenty of water and liquid fertilizer. Mulching will help.
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are never alone or weary of life" ~ Rachel Carson
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Re: 2012 Vegetable & Varieties Grow List

Postby davefrombc » Apr 16, 2012 12:10 am

I like spinach , but I much prefer Swiss chard, especially the burgundy chard. Another green that is good is "New Zealand"spinach.. Pick young leaves and keep it watered and you should have greens all summer .. Older stems get woody, but the leaves and young stems are great.. I have some that overwintered and is still growing..
Another spring green you might like is free for the picking .. Wear gloves.. Young stinging nettles are good , but have a slightly fuzzy texture .. cook them like spinach. The heat neutralizes the sting.
BC Fraser Valley zone 7/8
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Re: 2012 Vegetable & Varieties Grow List

Postby DonnaZn2SK » Apr 16, 2012 12:43 am

I like Swiss chard too, Dave. I'll probably put in a few plants if I have the room; I like the Bright Lights variety.

I would like to try either Red Russian or Dinosaur kale if I can find the seeds. The only seed packets I can find in town are the regular green and the redbor varieties. It's not really worth the bother to do mail order for this because I'm the only one who would eat it anyway. Have you ever heard of tree kale? I saw a youtube video of a guy growing it in his yard and it got to be over 8 feet tall!

I know you grow some neat things in your solarium, but do you have a vegetable garden as well?
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Re: 2012 Vegetable & Varieties Grow List

Postby styric » Apr 16, 2012 1:47 am

DonnaZn2SK wrote:styric,
Lyn's growing the white patty pan squash too.

Is this the first time growing Purple Prince? I grew it a couple of years ago and didn't like it - flavor was insipid for me. The Sun Sugar is terrific, I'd even go as far to say that it tops the Sun Gold because it is so much more prolific. I only have to grow the one plant to get enough for a steady supply throughout the summer. Too bad we can't save seeds for this variety. When you are buying your herbs, make sure to buy French tarragon rather than Russian (?), it the better of the two.

Chelsea,
Can you give me an update at the end of the season on your spinach? I grow Bloomsdale and it bolts quite readily. I grew the variety Catalina one year and it was really good, haven't been able to locate seeds for it since.


I've gotten lots of tarragon before so no worries :D As for the tomatoes, this is my first time with Purple Prince, Brandywine and Krim. I bought the Black Krim from Love Apple Farms, the rest I traded Krim seeds in return for the otheres. This is my second here with Sun Sugars and I've decided never to be without them again. I had SIX plants last year that were picked clean every day by my husband and father in law. I wish I could save seed with those, I really do. At least I can with the rest of the varieties if I like them enough.
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Re: 2012 Vegetable & Varieties Grow List

Postby OGrubber » Apr 16, 2012 11:06 am

DonnaZn2SK wrote:Lyn,..Is that white patty pan squash classified as summer or winter squash? ....

Inge,...Another question for you...what is the best way to put down the alfalfa pellets so that I don't attract animals to my garden? Should I be worried about that anyway?

Most patty pans are considered a summer squash, best eaten when young. Usually bush types.
Good question about the alfalfa "pellets". I was thinking about that after I said to go ahead and use it. It shouldn't be a problem as far as attracting animals, because you're incorporating it into the soil. But! You'll want to flake it somehow to get even distribution, I'm thinking. Reconstituting it by adding water would enable you to break it up but, that would be quite the job and "stinky" too if you did it in a wheel barrow or some-such and then tried to spread it on the garden. What I would probably do is till it in as is, wet the garden down and re-till when the soil became dry enough. That would also take care of the wait period needed after any organic matter gets incorporated into the soil. Dried alfalfa usually only needs about a week to break down enough before you can plant seedlings into it.
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Re: 2012 Vegetable & Varieties Grow List

Postby DonnaZn2SK » Apr 16, 2012 12:04 pm

Thanks for the advice, Inge. My husband wants to just put the alfalfa in the furrows as we are planting, but I would like to add organic matter to the whole area. We used to add a few bales of peat every year when we rototilled, but I've come to the conclusion that that didn't really help the garden in the long run. We did an interesting experiment last year - we made large trenches and refilled with good quality planting soil and then seeded in that...the garden did really well. I got the bags for a song that year, I don't expect to be able to repeat it. Predictably, the root crops did so much better in the light soil than the old clay.

I will be saving some of the alfalfa pellets to make alfalfa tea, it's supposed to be very good for the gardens - not supposed to smell very nice though.
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Re: 2012 Vegetable & Varieties Grow List

Postby Dumbo » Apr 16, 2012 2:30 pm

DonnaZn2SK wrote:it's supposed to be very good for the gardens

That's cuz it naturally contains some sort of growth hormone or growth stimulant that plants can use. Other than that it's pretty low on the NPK. Actually, very low.
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Re: 2012 Vegetable & Varieties Grow List

Postby styric » Apr 16, 2012 4:49 pm

I am looking forward to pattypan squash. I'm always buying it from the farmer's market, they're so good grilled.
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Re: 2012 Vegetable & Varieties Grow List

Postby OGrubber » Apr 16, 2012 5:31 pm

DonnaZn2SK wrote:....I will be saving some of the alfalfa pellets to make alfalfa tea, it's supposed to be very good for the gardens - not supposed to smell very nice though.

It'll be fine. If you can handle locker-room socks, then this won't faze you. laf!
Trenching would actually save doing all the steps I mentioned, so the easiest solution yet.
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