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using glass cloches for houseplants

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using glass cloches for houseplants

Postby Booky » May 28, 2012 10:06 am

Hi All,

I've acquired a lovely large glass cloche and I'd like to use it indoors. What plants flourish under cloches? Any tips on caring for cloched houseplants? I'd love to hear from those of you who have used cloches successfully.

The spot I have in mind for the cloche is in front of a south-facing window. The window has blinds that generally remain closed (so the light is low & diffused).

Many thanks :)
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Re: using glass cloches for houseplants

Postby Eeyore » May 28, 2012 10:31 am

Wow! What a great find. I've always admired cloches but been afraid to use one myself. I hope someone here has and has some info to pass on.
Lyn
AB, Zone 3A
----------------------------------
“Those who say it can't be done are usually interrupted by others doing it.” ` James Arthur Baldwin"
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Re: using glass cloches for houseplants

Postby Peggy2296 » May 29, 2012 12:36 pm

Ooh, nice! I've done terrariums before, so know a bit about planting under glass. What exactly are you planning to put under the cloche? One plant in a pot, or a larger, shallow dish (I used saucer from large terra cotta pots) with a mixture of plants?
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Re: using glass cloches for houseplants

Postby Booky » May 29, 2012 9:57 pm

I'd like to put a single plant in a terra cotta pot under the cloche. I was thinking perhaps a fern or an african violet... What kinds of plants have you grown successfully under cloches?
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Re: using glass cloches for houseplants

Postby Peggy2296 » May 30, 2012 11:28 am

I used small plants that grow very slowly, like Neanthe Bella palm, baby tears, small Pilea, pepperomias. Some, like the pretty pink polka dot plant is one of the best for terrariums as it really needs the very high humidity found under glass to grow well.

Miniature African Violets would also work well, provided they get enough light to bloom, but not so much light the plants will cook.

The pot should have a layer of stones at the bottom, then a layer of charcoal (which you can get at any petstore) under the soil to keep it sweet. After the initial watering when you set the plant up, water very seldom, as the water will not evaporate under the glass but will recycle itself. You can also buy some moss to put around the base of plants for a very pretty look!
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Re: using glass cloches for houseplants

Postby Booky » May 30, 2012 5:11 pm

Peggy,
Thanks so much for the tips. I Googled the plants you suggested & will try Baby Tears if I can find it (what a pretty plant) or Pink Polka Dot perhaps. Do the plants risk getting moldy or root rot under the glass? I read somewhere online that it's a good idea to lift the glass for a few minutes each day to clear the condensation. Do you think that's necessary?

I'd love to see pictures of people's cloched houseplants (or outdoor cloches for that matter). I'll post a picture of mine once I get it set up :)

Thank you again.
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Re: using glass cloches for houseplants

Postby Peggy2296 » May 30, 2012 5:59 pm

There shouldn't be too much condensation if you don't overwater. Overwatering is always bad for houseplants, but for plants under glass it can kill them.

It may take a little experimenting to find out how much to water without creating a lot of condensation. In the beginning when you're not sure, check regularly to make sure plants aren't drying out or becoming waterlogged. The glass and moss (if you choose to use it) should keep the plant evenly moist without it getting soggy = creating rot or fungus. IF there's a lot of condensation, cut down on the watering. African Violets really don't like moisture sitting on their leaves.

Plants grown under glass can really be the easiest way to keep houseplants, especially those that need more humidity than the average home can supply.

Have fun creating a miniature world under glass. Just be careful, since it can become addictive and you might find you want to create entire, tiny landscapes with "lawns" , "ponds" etc!
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Re: using glass cloches for houseplants

Postby Booky » Jun 02, 2012 6:31 pm

Thank you... I can see how this could be addictive! I purchased an African violet today and potted it as you suggested. (I couldn't find Baby's Tears or the polka dot plant at my local stores.) I'll post a picture in a few weeks if it is doing well.
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Re: using glass cloches for houseplants

Postby Booky » Jun 10, 2012 11:10 am

The African Violet was too big for the cloche but this Polka Dot plant is doing well so far. I watered it once after potting last week and there is still plenty of moisture in the cloche.

Thanks again for the tips!
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