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Garden potatoes

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Garden potatoes

Postby Mygrandmeresgarden » Jun 24, 2012 1:04 pm

These are my potatoes just starting to flower in my garden. I used seed from last year and seeded my potatoes whole. Once the flowers have dried up, we should be able to eat new potatoes! So much better than store bought!
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Re: Garden potatoes

Postby Dumbo » Jun 24, 2012 3:50 pm

Your simple little garden looks to be the size of my house :lol:
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Re: Garden potatoes

Postby Mygrandmeresgarden » Jun 24, 2012 4:46 pm

I'm a farm girl from Saskatchewan, of course I have tons of taters for the winter! :lol:
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Re: Garden potatoes

Postby Heidi S » Jun 25, 2012 12:44 am

Well that sure puts my paltry 9 potato plants in a raised bed to shame - but I don't have any cold storage for more than a few just for taste. I would love more, but that means taking over the neighbour's lawn, and I suspect he would object.

Looks great to me!
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Prince George, BC
Zone 3!

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Re: Garden potatoes

Postby Millie » Jul 02, 2012 10:19 am

Wow that is a good looking crop of potatoes.

This year I buried my kitchen scraps directly in the ground and now I have potato plants coming up. Just read recently they may not be good for my tomatoes as a disease may happen.

Late blight is a hard-to-manage disease caused by a funguslike pathogen that also targets potatoes. In fact, it's believed that recent outbreaks most likely stem from contaminated seed potatoes or potato tubers that were tossed in a pile, survived the mild winter, and sprouted this spring, full of disease-causing late-blight spores. Spotting late blight early isn't always easy, either—it resembles other tomato plant problems like drought stress, early blight, Septoria leaf spot, and gray mold, making it hard for gardeners to make a positive ID.

http://www.rodale.com/late-blight-2012
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Re: Garden potatoes

Postby Big Smile » Jul 02, 2012 10:33 am

Diane, your potatoe patch sure looks healthy. The bugs are SO bad on our plants. Hubby said this morning "why do we bother growing potatoes" ? Maybe none next year.
Between potatoe bugs and bunnies , it takes the fun out of veggie gardening. We do have fantastic tomatoe plants though.
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Re: Garden potatoes

Postby A Closet Canuck » Jul 02, 2012 9:24 pm

That's impressive! Makes me want to buy a tractor and 10 acres. Would love to have a garden that big and healthy looking.

I grow potatoes (usually the red potato variety, 'Pontiac') in spots in the garden that are temporarily vacant. This year, they are on the southeast side of the house in what is turning into a shrub border. Supposedly, using a different spot each year helps to prevent disease. So far, so good.

Hope you have bumper crop!
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Re: Garden potatoes

Postby Mygrandmeresgarden » Jul 03, 2012 11:51 pm

Big Smile wrote:Diane, your potatoe patch sure looks healthy. The bugs are SO bad on our plants. Hubby said this morning "why do we bother growing potatoes" ? Maybe none next year.
Between potatoe bugs and bunnies , it takes the fun out of veggie gardening. We do have fantastic tomatoe plants though.
Clara


So far, I haven't had any potato bugs. I do make sure though to rotate my potato plantings from year to year. You should get a Dustin Mizer to apply diatomaceous earth or rotanone (spell?). My grandfather use to go with a bit of gas in a can and knock them off the plant and into the gas. Those old farmers!
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Re: Garden potatoes

Postby Mygrandmeresgarden » Jul 03, 2012 11:54 pm

A Closet Canuck wrote:That's impressive! Makes me want to buy a tractor and 10 acres. Would love to have a garden that big and healthy looking.

I grow potatoes (usually the red potato variety, 'Pontiac') in spots in the garden that are temporarily vacant. This year, they are on the southeast side of the house in what is turning into a shrub border. Supposedly, using a different spot each year helps to prevent disease. So far, so good.

Hope you have bumper crop!

Last year was very wet and then very dry and the ground turned rock hard. The potatoes were small but good tasting. Im hoping for my monster sized ones again this year. Im trying a couple of potato barrels this year...the plants look healthy...but are there any potatoes? I love Pontiacs and we also grow Vikings as well as a few other varieties.
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Re: Garden potatoes

Postby Mygrandmeresgarden » Jul 03, 2012 11:56 pm

Millie wrote:Wow that is a good looking crop of potatoes.

This year I buried my kitchen scraps directly in the ground and now I have potato plants coming up. Just read recently they may not be good for my tomatoes as a disease may happen.

Late blight is a hard-to-manage disease caused by a funguslike pathogen that also targets potatoes. In fact, it's believed that recent outbreaks most likely stem from contaminated seed potatoes or potato tubers that were tossed in a pile, survived the mild winter, and sprouted this spring, full of disease-causing late-blight spores. Spotting late blight early isn't always easy, either—it resembles other tomato plant problems like drought stress, early blight, Septoria leaf spot, and gray mold, making it hard for gardeners to make a positive ID.

http://www.rodale.com/late-blight-2012

I've had potatoes grow from my own seed for years. Never had any blight here or mold for that matter. We work manure into the half the garden every year and rotate. I have wonderful healthy veggies and weeds for that matter!
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