Fruit & Vegetable Gardening - Gardening Forums

Strange Looking

Interested in growing a vegetable garden or a fruit garden? Whether you’re gardening indoors or outdoors, planting an edible garden can be easy and fun

Re: Strange Looking

Postby CdnChelsea » Jun 27, 2012 12:12 pm


You do know some of the other members here are going to be mad at me, Dumbo for not trying the epsom salts.

So after thinking about it for a minute, I (being a woman) changed my mind...
sort of...

I'm going to treat half the tomato plants with epsom salts and do nothing to the others.
This way, everyone is happy.

"Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth
are never alone or weary of life" ~ Rachel Carson
User avatar
CdnChelsea
 
Posts: 1106
Joined: Nov 06, 2010 11:26 pm

Re: Strange Looking

Postby Dumbo » Jun 27, 2012 12:24 pm

I edited my last reply to you on the previous page.

Yeah I know. But these people are wrong. Believe in voodoo and can't accept fact. Let them be mad.
The internet is a very, very, serious entity created solely for commercial gains.
Canadian Gardening made me a hardcore separatist
User avatar
Dumbo
 
Posts: 2070
Joined: Feb 06, 2012 11:20 pm
Location: Zone 5

Re: Strange Looking

Postby B_BQ » Jun 27, 2012 3:43 pm

CdnChelsea: Did you start these plants from your own seed? Or, did you buy them as seedlings from a nursery? If you started the seeds yourself then it might be worth starting some more, in a different location and different soil, just to compare.
~BBQ
Zone 5b
South/Central Ontario

Every day may not be good, but there's something good in every day
~ Author Unknown
User avatar
B_BQ
 
Posts: 6854
Joined: Nov 14, 2006 1:59 pm
Location: Bay of Quinte, SE Ontario Zone 5a/b

Re: Strange Looking

Postby CdnChelsea » Jun 27, 2012 8:32 pm


Luckily, when I planted those tomato plants in the new garden, I also planted some of the same Brandywine tomato plants in other gardens and containers. The good thing is they are doing fine. No curly leaves...nothing wrong.

So I am thinking the ph in the soil could be wrong for growing tomatoes.
But the strange thing is, everything else in the same garden ... the perennials, annuals and pepper plants are doing great with no sign of any problem. It's just the tomato plants.
Oh and they are no longer producing flowers. The ones that were there shriveled up and died.



"Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth
are never alone or weary of life" ~ Rachel Carson
User avatar
CdnChelsea
 
Posts: 1106
Joined: Nov 06, 2010 11:26 pm

Re: Strange Looking

Postby Dumbo » Jun 27, 2012 9:09 pm

Physiological Leaf Roll of Tomato
http://cru.cahe.wsu.edu/CEPublications/ ... PNW616.pdf
A fact sheet prepared by The Pacific Northwest Vegetable Extension Group, which includes specialists from the University of Idaho, Oregon State University, Washington State University, and USDA-ARS who contribute expertise in plant pathology, horticulture, and entomology to help identify and offer solutions to vegetable problems in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington.

EDIT:
I don't see, "add magnesium". ;)

EDIT 2:
Couple of Canadian sources:
Tomato Leaf Roll
http://agbio.usask.ca/pests-tomato

Name of problem: Tomato leaf roll
Problem type: Environmental
http://umanitoba.ca/afs/hort_inquiries/ ... _roll.html

Another EDIT:
If it was the leaf roll virus your leafs would be turning yellow.

The first link by the dozen experts say not to add nitrogen, or nothing high in "N", but they state you can try some phos for the roots, but to go light on it.
The internet is a very, very, serious entity created solely for commercial gains.
Canadian Gardening made me a hardcore separatist
User avatar
Dumbo
 
Posts: 2070
Joined: Feb 06, 2012 11:20 pm
Location: Zone 5

Re: Strange Looking

Postby maryjanej » Jul 03, 2012 2:56 am

Would it be possible that the problem could be caused by the nearby cedar trees ?

I read this when I googled.
I'm not sure about how cedar trees effect vegetables but they have a fungus called gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae that can wreak havoc on fruit trees.

http://www.helpfulgardener.com/phpBB2/v ... hp?t=13393

Mary-Jane
User avatar
maryjanej
 
Posts: 70
Joined: Nov 27, 2006 7:09 pm
Location: Eastern Ontario zone 5

Re: Strange Looking

Postby maryjanej » Jul 03, 2012 2:58 am

Would it be possible that the problem could be caused by the nearby cedar trees ?

I read this when I googled.
I'm not sure about how cedar trees effect vegetables but they have a fungus called gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae that can wreak havoc on fruit trees.

http://www.helpfulgardener.com/phpBB2/v ... hp?t=13393

Mary-Jane
User avatar
maryjanej
 
Posts: 70
Joined: Nov 27, 2006 7:09 pm
Location: Eastern Ontario zone 5

Previous

Return to Fruit & Vegetable Gardening

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron

Follow Style At Home Online

Facebook Activity

Contests

Latest Contests

more contests