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Pepper Recipes. Jalapeno & Hungarian wax peppers

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Pepper Recipes. Jalapeno & Hungarian wax peppers

Postby Dumbo » Jul 28, 2012 10:12 pm

So I have a tonne of this stuff. Well not a ton, but 2 plastic bags full that I picked.

Anyone have ideas on what to do with them besides freezing?

I read you are supposed to heat peppers and peel them. I tried it as a test on these two types, doesn't work too well. The Yellow wax one will peel, but I have to scorch it before it peels. And after that is doesn't even peel very well.

The Jalapeno doesn't appear to peel.

Are these types even supposed to peel?

Tried making pickled peppers w/ the yellow ones like what you buy in the store (the rings type thing) a few years back, but they stayed very hard, crisp & crunchy. This is the one thing I want soft and soggy, like what you buy.

Any idea's? Wrong pepper for this?

As usual, any recipes appreciated. I'm pretty much pepper dumb (my dumbness knows no bounds).

I also have 2 bags full of cayenne/chili peppers, but I'll try the dehydrator on these ones.

Also have a bunch of Asian peppers. These I'll freeze I guess. Unless these can be softened and put into a mixed pickled pepper thing.

The only thing that I found that softens peppers is freezing. Wonder if I should freeze them before pickling? Thoughts?
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Re: Pepper Recipes. Jalapeno & Hungarian wax peppers

Postby B_BQ » Jul 28, 2012 10:44 pm

Marc: Peel peppers! Well, of course you can.
If you really do want to take the skin off a pepper, then put the whole pepper over an open flame, or on a very hot bbq, and blister it all over until it's burnt-looking. Pop the pepper into a paper bag, or plastic bag, or bowl covered in plastic, and the steam will release the skin. Easy to rub off, but don't wash off! They're called roasted peppers.
Sweet peppers go very soft when frozen, but you can use them in stir fries, so freezing them is not a bad thing.
All the hot peppers, jalapenos, cayenne, hot banana, etc., can be dried or pickled.
I have good success with drying - one layer, on parchment paper overnight at 200 - 225 in a regular oven. Will then keep forever in a jar in the pantry.
Salsa! Easy, very forgiving, and once made will keep a long time!
Make lots of sauces with chopped sweet peppers and freeze.
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Re: Pepper Recipes. Jalapeno & Hungarian wax peppers

Postby Dumbo » Jul 28, 2012 11:35 pm

Good info. I'll pick it all apart tomorrow and try and make a plan out of this.

Yeah that's how I did them as a test, on the BBQ till they had some bubbles of burt. But it really didn't peel well. Maybe I didn't blister it enough. Didn't know the burnt looking bubble was what I should be aiming for.

B_BQ wrote:Pop the pepper into a paper bag, or plastic bag, or bowl covered in plastic, and the steam will release the skin.


I haven't read to do this. Will give this another try tomorrow and report back on how it goes.

So you dry them and toss them in a jar or similar? Then you use those in a Salsa type thing later on?
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Re: Pepper Recipes. Jalapeno & Hungarian wax peppers

Postby davefrombc » Jul 29, 2012 12:26 am

To peel the peppers, char the skins on your BBQ or use a propane flame /flame from a gas range if you cook with gas, and then toss the charred peppers into a bag or covered bowl to sweat and release the skins, as B-BQ mentioned.. They should rub off easily then . You can dry and grind the hot peppers to store them .. how about making hot pepper salsa and pasta sauces? There's lots of recipes to be had for them up on the net
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Re: Pepper Recipes. Jalapeno & Hungarian wax peppers

Postby Dumbo » Jul 29, 2012 2:22 am

davefrombc wrote:how about making hot pepper salsa and pasta sauces?


My tomatoes aren't ready yet...
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Re: Pepper Recipes. Jalapeno & Hungarian wax peppers

Postby B_BQ » Jul 29, 2012 7:42 am

Dumbo wrote:My tomatoes aren't ready yet...


Perhaps you could buy a few tomatoes to make the salsa. Sometimes not everything is ready for picking at the same time. Your local farmer's market or stand may already have fresh local tomatoes. Often these are grown in greenhouses.
But, you could make salsa with a few bought tomatoes, or even canned in a pinch.

If you have sweet peppers and/or chili peppers ready now though, you should probably get something done with them in the next few days.

If I have a lot of red chili peppers to use up, I dry them, leave some whole and grind up the rest. Put into a jar and store in pantry! When your own tomatoes are ready you can then make more salsa and sauces using some of your dried chili peppers!

For the roasted peppers, I'll reiterate what I said and what Dave said too. Once you've charred the outside of the peppers, (all over), they will be hot. Put the peppers into a bowl covered tightly with plastic wrap, or into a plastic bag and twist closed. The heat from the peppers will cause steam and once cooled down a little the skins will be very easy to rub off. Cut or break them open and remove the seeds and membrane.

If you like roasted peppers you could just slice some of them and dress them simply with a little olive oil, red wine vinegar, garlic, s&p and let them marinate until you're ready to eat them. They'll certainly keep for a couple of days in the fridge.

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Re: Pepper Recipes. Jalapeno & Hungarian wax peppers

Postby Dumbo » Jul 29, 2012 11:26 am

B_BQ wrote:Perhaps you could buy a few tomatoes to make the salsa.

Nah, I have so many tomato plants that i'll be up to my arm pits in tomato's very soon, if they ever turn red. They've been hanging there for a month all green. Only have the very odd one turning red.

So waiting for those to do salsa, tomato sauce and tomato. Never canned these three things before so want to try it. Also have a new pressure canner I want to try as well for these low acid things.

The pepper plants will give me another few batches of peppers, so I'll have more peppers anyhow to go with this.

But yeah, I looked up pickled peppers in my books, and they do say to peel them first to soften them. But they don't give that tip on bagging them after scorching them. So i'll try it later today.

I didn't check if there is something for pressure canning these....

Your piccadilly thing (might have spelled that wrong). What goes in it? Is that the same as something called chow-chow?
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Re: Pepper Recipes. Jalapeno & Hungarian wax peppers

Postby B_BQ » Jul 29, 2012 12:14 pm

Dumbo wrote:Your piccadilly thing (might have spelled that wrong). What goes in it? Is that the same as something called chow-chow?


Marc: Laughing at that one! Piccadilly is in London, England.
Piccalilli is a mustard pickle, similar to chow-chow. English piccalilli is probably a little more tart than the NA chow-chow. It's bright yellow - comes from the turmeric used.
Piccalilli is probably an acquired taste, or something one grows up with. I grew up with it, so it's part of my tastebud experience.
My son popped over this morning and wondered if I had any pickled onions left. I did. So he had a couple of chunks of extra strong cheddar and a few pickled onions. Both my son and daughter are big fans of extra strong cheddar, pickled onions, and piccalilli! We all love pickled beets too. It must be in the genes!
He noticed I had gathered some jars together, spices, etc. and wondered what they were for. When I said pickled onions he put in his order!
BTW - the last lot of dills I made I've thrown out. They were not good. Too salty and too soft. I won't be processing another batch - the end product is too soft and mushy!
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Re: Pepper Recipes. Jalapeno & Hungarian wax peppers

Postby Dumbo » Jul 29, 2012 12:51 pm

I 100% agree on the boiling water pickles. They are good for nothing and are disgusting to even bite down on. Those are gone as well.

Bernardin lied. And lied again when I called them.

But, the ones I did at 88C were ok. I did more since then, keeping it at 83C, and those are even better and the kids like them. They have an even better crunch and aren't soft.

It took a while, and a lot of bitching in these forums, but eh, it paid off in the end. I never expected to be led astray by a monopoly canning company in lies...

Yeah, I'm sure non-heat processed are even more better with a super-crunch.

B_BQ wrote:Piccalilli is a mustard pickle, similar to chow-chow.

Yeah I seem to recall looking at it the other day when Eeyore mentioned mustard pickles. I'll give this one a shot. The American recipes I saw say it's the same as chowchow, so I'd rather not go near the American recipes. Maybe tomorrow evening I'll try it. Not sure if this is the one with green tomatoes. Saw so many recipes w/ mustard it made me dizzy.

If you have a fav recipe, I'll try it. Don't worry about the English tartness. I like to try new things anyhow (except for scary grass, pickles and pickled beans in a drink). :p

You are making me jealous about the pickled Onions. I only had like about 50-seeds or less. When I looked at Dominion's website this morning they say it's over a hundred seeds. So I think I got short changed on that one :/

Same with some tomato's. I bought only two kinds, marzano and Big Beef. Yet I have 2 of them that resembles a small celebrity tomato or a Campbell's. oh well.

Piccalilli... Piccadilly... I was close :p
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Re: Pepper Recipes. Jalapeno & Hungarian wax peppers

Postby B_BQ » Jul 29, 2012 1:32 pm

Marc:

This is a very old English recipe that I first made in 2003 according to my notes.

I did not have all the ingredients, (I left marrow out but did use a zucchini), and I used the small silverskin onions you can buy in a big bag, frozen, and they worked out okay. I also used yellow and green beans chopped into 1/2" pieces.

I made a note in the book to cook the veg in future only 10 minutes, and to use a bit more turmeric.

I've made this piccalilli since then and I must have followed my own instructions, cuz it turned out very well.

You can obviously change the quantity of veg and adjust the other quantities depending on your own personal needs and tastes.

PICCALILLI - Good Housekeeping's Cookery Book - British

6 lb prepared vegetables (marrow, cucumber, beans, small onions, cauliflower)
1 lb salt
1 gallon water (*remember an English pint is 20 ozs!)
9 oz sugar
2 level tsps. dry mustard
1 1/2 level tsps ground ginger
3 pints white vinegar
1 1/2 oz flour
2 level TBS turmeric (*I have a note to increase this quantity slightly)

**A tsp is about the same as North America but an English tablespoon is slightly more than in North America, but you can adjust these quantities easily enough.

Dice the marrow and cucumbers, slice the beans, halve the onions, (*or use whole if using the tiny frozen silverskin), and break the cauliflower into small florets. (Very small, no bigger than bite-size). Dissolve the salt in the water and add the vegetables. Cover and leave for 24 hours.
Drain the vegetables. Blend the sugar, mustard and ginger with 2 1/2 pints vinegar in a large pan, add the vegetables, bring to the boil and simmer for 20 minutes. (**I have a note to simmer for only 10 minutes). Blend the flour and turmeric with the remaining 1/2 pint of vinegar and stir into the cooked vegetables. Bring to the boil and cook for 1-2 minutes. Pot and cover.
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