Plant Talk - Gardening Forums

Perennial Poppies

For help in growing and maintaining your favourite plants, from sowing seeds and staking perennials to pruning roses, shrubs and trees, join the discussion.

Perennial Poppies

Postby Vendella01 » Oct 20, 2012 1:38 pm

I planted a couple perennial poppies two years ago in front of my house which faces east Im in zone 4, Last winter which was the first winter for them, they stayed green all winter and kept growing. This year they bloomed, but they never died back, Now it is October, and they are growing still. I planted poppies before in my last house, they always died down and came up in the spring, these ones have never died down, I guess my question is: Is it harmful to keep on going and never have the die down? Is it because they are close to the house? Im confused.
User avatar
Vendella01
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Mar 18, 2012 1:01 pm

Re: Perennial Poppies

Postby CdnChelsea » Oct 21, 2012 7:33 pm


I've had perennial poppies for years and they alway show new growth in late August and stay green all winter with no side effects.

Here is a c/p from the National Gardening Association regarding the Oriental poppies:

[/Sporting huge, cup-shaped blooms in early summer, the Oriental poppy is the most striking of the perennial poppies, and the delicate, papery flowers belie the plant's hardiness and durability.

About This Plant

A favorite subject for artists, Oriental poppy flowers are the focal point in the garden when they are in full bloom in late spring to early summer. The plant's huge flowers may be up to 6 inches across on stems up to 4 feet tall. Colors include red, salmon, orange, crimson, and white. Oriental poppies perform poorly in regions with hot summers, and the flowers may need staking to keep from flopping over when in full bloom. The plants go dormant after blooming.

Special Features
Easy care/low maintenance
Deer resistant
Planting Instructions
Plant in spring, spacing plants 2 to 3 feet apart, depending on the variety. Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently. Water thoroughly.

Care
Apply a thin layer of compost each spring, followed by a 2-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeds. During the summer months, when plants are dormant, watering is needed only during periods of drought. [b][In autumn, poppies will resume foilage growth until frost and these green leaves will remain over winter.
After soil has frozen, apply a 4- to 6-inch layer of protective mulch to prevent heaving during periods of temperature fluctuation. When the weather warms up in spring, gradually remove the winter mulch. Plants can be divided in early spring or summer.
"Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth
are never alone or weary of life" ~ Rachel Carson
User avatar
CdnChelsea
 
Posts: 1106
Joined: Nov 06, 2010 11:26 pm

Re: Perennial Poppies

Postby RubyTuesday49 » Oct 27, 2012 9:27 pm

My sister gave me some seeds from her pernnial poppy - pale pink with a light grey-green foliage. I'm not sure if I should start the seed inside in the early Spring or direct sow in the garden. Does the perennial poppy come back from the plant or does it reseed every year? I'll have to mark the planting so I remember what's coming up every Spring.
Gardening requires a lot of water - most of it in the form of perspiration.
User avatar
RubyTuesday49
 
Posts: 140
Joined: Sep 02, 2012 5:41 pm
Location: South Central BC - Zone 6a

Re: Perennial Poppies

Postby lindamct2010 » Oct 27, 2012 11:04 pm

hHi Ruby! Direct Sow is best for Perennial Poppies. Believe it or not..NOW! Perennial Poppy Seeds need real cold germination. So saying that, sow where you want them to grow next Spring. They do come back from the plant, however they will self seed, but they can carefully be removed when young to not cause over crowding. The self seeding with the Perennial variety isn't invasive. Hope this helps. Snipping off the seed pods once the flowers are done prevents them from reseeding :)
User avatar
lindamct2010
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Oct 20, 2012 11:20 pm

Re: Perennial Poppies

Postby RubyTuesday49 » Oct 28, 2012 12:22 am

Oh - thanks Linda! Thanks for the info - I will get them planted tomorrow!!
Gardening requires a lot of water - most of it in the form of perspiration.
User avatar
RubyTuesday49
 
Posts: 140
Joined: Sep 02, 2012 5:41 pm
Location: South Central BC - Zone 6a


Return to Plant Talk

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

Follow Style At Home Online

Facebook Activity

Contests

Latest Contests

more contests