Plant Talk - Gardening Forums

New house, new garden

For help in growing and maintaining your favourite plants, from sowing seeds and staking perennials to pruning roses, shrubs and trees, join the discussion.

New house, new garden

Postby JenY » Jun 27, 2013 10:09 am

Hello gardeners :)

I'm looking for a bit of advice; I just bought a new house and have big plans for my new garden. Unfortunately I don't take possession until early August...waayyy too late to do any late-season plantings in a Zone 3. I know there's an area of my yard that requires a lot of clearing out (the owners let it overgrow with weeds, though I know there's some gems in there like rhubarb), but other than that what should I be doing to prepare for next spring? Should I start preparing the soil this fall or wait until after the ground thaws?

My plan is to establish some roses in a raised bed on the east-facing wall of my house and a line of raspberries and blackberries along a north-south-running fence on the west side of my property. Once I cleared out the wild patch I plan on adding asparagus plants in with the rhubarb, and putting in a raised bed for carrots, broccoli, onions, brussel sprouts, and peas. I also plan on doing some container gardening with tomatoes, peppers, strawberries and lettuce & herbs on my deck.

I also have a sizeable area that is deeply shaded by a large mature tree; I can't be certain if it's always shaded, but there doesn't seem to be much light under there. Is there something I can do with that space, or is it wasted from a gardening standpoint?

Any guidance on what work I should get done this year before frost would be greatly appreciated :)
User avatar
JenY
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Jun 27, 2013 9:48 am

Re: New house, new garden

Postby Jersm » Jun 28, 2013 10:44 am

personally i think the best bet this year is planting in pots. depending on your level of experience it will be a learning phase.

then even plant some plants that aren't just seasonal so they come back to live next year then you can transplant in the ground if you wish.

Just fill some pots with potting soil and leave them in very sunny areas and make sure to keep them watered. even twoards the end of the year you could transplant to the ground if youfeel like it
User avatar
Jersm
 
Posts: 164
Joined: Jul 26, 2012 12:55 pm

Re: New house, new garden

Postby Jersm » Jun 28, 2013 10:55 am

also for shaded areas many people love planting hostas like around a large tree.

Image
User avatar
Jersm
 
Posts: 164
Joined: Jul 26, 2012 12:55 pm

Re: New house, new garden

Postby conniepr » Jun 29, 2013 9:28 am

I plant new plants in the fall all the time (zone 3b). In fact, I often buy baby perennials and put them in my planter pots for contrast with the flowers and then plant them in the ground at the end of the season. I've been very surprised that they almost always survive the winter. I've done that with yarrow, coral bells (heuchera), speedwell, and lupins. Oh, and creeping jenny survived last winter when I just dumped the whole flower pot on top of a juniper I had just planted (late Sept or early Oct). I did it as a mulch around the roots of the new juniper to give it some more protection from the winter. The juniper was lovely this spring and... surprise, surprise, the creeping jenny was thriving. I dug it up and added it back into this Spring's flower pots!

One thing I would recommend is not making too many changes the first year, unless you already know what's in there and exactly what you want next year. You can certainly add compost this fall to improve the soil for next year. And save any leaves that fall off the trees and use them as mulch during the winter (for protection and for nutrients). If the leaves are large, run them through the lawn mower first and then collection them and spread them over the gardens.

Oh, the deeply shaded areas under the trees... here's my experience. #1 is that digging under the trees is risky, you can damage the roots of the trees. I've done it and love my results, but I did lose a huge pine tree in a windstorm the next year and I believe it could be because I weakened that side of the root system. Luckily, there were too many trees in that area and that pine tree was too close to the house anyways, so the loss was probably beneficial in the long run. Anyways, I've been much more careful digging around the remaining mountain ash and birch trees. I go in extremely carefully and if I run into roots, I stop. If I really want the plant there, then I put the plant in just above the undisturbed root and then build up the soil around the new plant. In the end, I ended up with two beautiful shade gardens with a ground level that is a little bit higher than it originally was.
005c.jpg
June 2012 003c.jpg
User avatar
conniepr
 
Posts: 250
Joined: Jul 09, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Zone 3

Re: New house, new garden

Postby JenY » Jul 02, 2013 1:59 pm

Other than the one wild spot (which looked more to be a dumping ground for dead branches than an actual growing space for anything other than rhubarb) the previous owners didn't do much gardening...the areas I'm contending with are either crushed gravel or grass, so it'll be a matter of putting in some raised beds over it, not too much concern with what's already been planted.

As to the shaded area - yeah, I wasn't going to start digging in around the roots, the soil between them is fairly compacted and bare anyways. My plan was to mound up soil and plant on top of the existing soil, so at least any plants in there would be getting some nutrients from the soil, if not the sun. :lol:

You know, I had thought about potting for the herbs and possibly lettuce to bring them inside when it turns cold in the fall, but I hadn't thought of potting perennials for planting later... it would actually work to stash the pots in a sunny spot outside my office until I can move in a month. I was concerned that such a short growing season (I looked up the average first frost date for my area...September 8! :x ) would make it difficult for any perennials to store enough nutrients to grow again in the spring, but an extra month in a pot might give some of them a fighting chance; and some of the garden centres should be having clearance sales pretty soon I imagine :D
User avatar
JenY
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Jun 27, 2013 9:48 am

Re: New house, new garden

Postby conniepr » Jul 02, 2013 6:22 pm

Yep, the garden centre clearance sales are starting now and I was bad today! I bought a new rose bush and two more clematis! :D
User avatar
conniepr
 
Posts: 250
Joined: Jul 09, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Zone 3


Return to Plant Talk

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 14 guests

Follow Style At Home Online

Facebook Activity

Contests

Latest Contests

more contests