Garden Gear - Garden Tools

What lawn mower will meet your grass cutting needs?

By
Anja Sonnenberg

The lowdown on choosing the right mower for your lawn


Most homeowners don't relish the idea of cutting the grass on a Saturday morning, but choosing the right lawn mower for your yard can make the job much easier. Lawn mowers come in a variety of sizes, models and price ranges, so before you make a decision to buy a new one, take some time to see which is the best fit for your grass cutting needs.

Option 1: The manual reel mower

If you have a small urban lot, a manual lawn mower may be all you need. As the most basic type of mower on the market, the manual reel cuts grass using a series of curved blades that rotate when pushed. The manual push operation makes this mower environmentally friendly and quiet to operate. It also helps make them very economical and low maintenance, but remember to sharpen the blades regularly. If your lot is hilly or uneven, you may find some difficulty manoeuvering the manual reel to cut the grass evenly, but these zero-emission mowers are a great choice for flat lawns.

Option 2: The electric corded mower

The electric corded mower is another great option for homeowners who maintain smaller lawns, but keep in mind the mower has to be plugged in to use it. Some people get frustrated by constantly having to manoeuver the mower and cord, but otherwise the electric corded mower is light and easy to handle. With the push of a button, it will come to life and it runs quietly without creating harmful emissions. You also have the option of choosing a model with bagging, mulching and side discharge for clippings.

Option 3: The electric cordless mower with a rechargeable battery

Electric cordless mowers offer the same benefits as their electric corded counterparts, but they also provide greater mobility by eliminating that cord. The cordless mower may sound like a great option for your grass-cutting needs, but be aware that the rechargeable battery does need maintenance—recharging and replacing the battery when it no longer holds a charge. It's far more expensive than its corded counterpart and therefore not as popular with some homeowners.

 

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