Plants - Flower Bulbs

Video: Planting tips for spring bulbs

Learn how to create the perfect growing environment for spring blooms.

Video – Planting tips for spring bulbs

Hi, I'm Stephen Westcott-Gratton for Canadiangardening.com. Today we're going to be planting a few spring bulbs, and there's nothing I love to do more on a beautiful autumn afternoon like this one - it gives you something to think about on those cold winter nights!

Bulbs are like perennials, they're a long-term investment, and so you first want to well prepare your soil. I've added lots of composted manure and bone meal to this soil - bone meal is especially important, as it's high in phosphorous and really good for rooting, as well as bud and bloom development.

Today we're going to plant a camassia, it's lesser known than tulips, daffodils and crocus but it's a wonderful, native spring bulb that comes in blue and white. When planting the camassia, the usual rule applies: always plant bulbs right side up. You can usually tell from some of the left over foliage on the top of the bulb, as well as leftover roots on the bottom. Make sure the bulbs are facing toward the light and insert them into the soil three times as deep as they are long - approximately 3- 4 cm.

Because I want to get a little extra 'bang for my buck' in this particular section of the garden, in addition to planting these camissas deep into the soil, I'm going to plant a smaller bulb, such as the chionodoxa, also called 'glory of the snow,' above it. And again, it's easy to see which side is up because of the leftover foliage at the tip, and the root scales on the bottom. The chionodoxas should also be planted three times their depth into the soil, however they are small enough that you can just press them into the ground.

Once you have all your bulbs in place, the only other thing you must remember, is that letting the foliage mature naturally is essential if you want them to bloom again the following year. Braiding daffodil leaves together or trying to cut off leaves entirely is discouraged; it's best to leave them alone. This way you'll be provided with a perennial display every season.

For Canadiangardening.com I’m Stephen Westcott-Gratton.

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